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So Oregon decriminalized heroin and meth

montrose818

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The future of this country is fucked.



Oregon decriminalizes possession of hard drugs, as four other states legalize recreational marijuana


By Cleve R. Wootson Jr. and Jaclyn Peiser
November 4, 2020 at 6:32 PM EST
PORTLAND, Ore. — The epiphany came in 2009, as Hubert Matthews prepared to spend another night on Portland’s streets.

For two decades he had been using drugs, then committing crimes to get more. He wanted out, but he saw no easy escape. His frequent use made him an easy target for police, leaving him a homeless, middle-aged man trapped by his addiction and the laws he broke to feed it.

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“I had to take a hard look at myself and say ‘I’m 47 years old and I don’t have anything going. I’m not a kingpin. I don’t have a job. I’m just a dope fiend,’” Matthews said. “I was getting arrested a lot for possession and little stuff over and over again to where my criminal record caused me to not be able to get a job, to not be able to get an apartment.”


Matthews, who is now a recovering addict and a drug abuse counselor, believes others will have an easier path after Oregon voters approved a controversial ballot measure decriminalizing possession of small amounts of so-called hard drugs, including cocaine, heroin, oxycodone and methamphetamines. Measure 110 also applies marijuana sales taxes toward payments for drug addiction treatment. Marijuana has been legal in Oregon since 2015.

Oregon also joined the District of Columbia in decriminalizing psychedelic mushrooms.

D.C. voters appear to approve ballot question to decriminalize psychedelic mushrooms

Four other states — New Jersey, Arizona, Montana and South Dakota — voted on Tuesday to legalize recreational marijuana, and Mississippi legalized cannabis for medical use. In total, nearly a third of the states have now eased the criminal consequences of marijuana use, though federal law still prohibits it.

Nearly 40 years after the start of the nation’s War on Drugs, Oregon’s upvote puts it at the forefront of shifting American attitudes about what communities should do about drug abuse. Proponents of decriminalization say it offers a remedy to a costly campaign that has done little improve society but has wreaked havoc on minority communities. An Oregon study showed that Black and Native American people were more likely to be convicted of drug crimes than White people, creating a record that follows low-level drug users around for the rest of their lives.

Oregon’s measure, which passed with almost 60 percent support, goes further than other states that have increasingly eased restrictions on drug use. Measure 110 decriminalizes hard drugs often associated with crippling addiction and social decay.

In favoring rehabilitation over incarceration, proponents say, the measure prevents recovering drug users from being stigmatized by employers, lenders and landlords for years — and gives them the ability to pull themselves out of a cycle of drug-related criminality.

“We have been criminalizing people for at least 50 years, and what we know is that it hasn’t gotten us any closer to having our loved ones get the care that they need at the scale that it requires,” said Kassandra Frederique, executive director of Drug Policy Alliance, which spent more than $4 million backing the Oregon measure. “Criminalization is not a deterrent to use, and it’s not a humane approach. This is about recognizing that we need to support people.”

Under the measure, people who possess larger quantities of illicit drugs could still face misdemeanor charges, and felony charges would apply to people who are alleged to possess enough drugs to sell.

Frederique said she hopes Oregon becomes a model for “a cascade of change in other places in the country.”

Marijuana advocates said they hope the wider support for legalization seen on Tuesday will put pressure on Congress to change federal marijuana laws.

“It comes down to the fact that marijuana prohibition has been an abject failure,” said Matthew Schweich, deputy director of the Marijuana Policy Project. “If you’re not going to punish people harshly for marijuana, then you might as well legalize it to control it and regulate and use revenue for important public services.”

But critics have cast Oregon's measure as a hasty sprint toward decriminalization that can strip communities of tools to compel addicts into rehabilitation and can sugarcoat the deadly consequences of hard drugs for both people and municipalities.

Kevin Sabet, the founder of Smart Approaches to Marijuana and a three-time White House Office of National Drug Control Policy adviser, called the ballot measure “a deliberate first step to legalize all drugs — heroin, cocaine, methamphetamine.”

The threat of criminal prosecution can be a powerful incentive for people to seek treatment, he said. Likewise, legalization can empower people to abuse drugs without fearing legal jeopardy.

“For a lot of people, they stop drinking once they got a DUI, and they realized what they were doing was wrong,” Sabet said. “I think a lot of people have gotten help through drug courts. For a lot of people, consequences are important. And I think we can find a way to marry the criminal justice and public health systems.”

Even other proponents of decriminalizing drug addiction warn that Oregon’s ballot measure tears down a nuanced system of getting people addiction treatment, replacing it with what they call a blunt instrument. Opponents of the measure said what passed Tuesday doesn’t address long-standing issues surrounding access to treatment.

Mike Marshall, co-founder and director of Oregon Recovers, said the measure threatens to replace addiction treatment infrastructure with a system that compels people to get assessments, but not actual treatment. He accused Measure 110’s marketing campaign of misleading Oregonians about weakened safeguards with regard to teenage drug use.

“The net effect of it is to take away a pathway to treatment to a bunch of people in Oregon,” Marshall said, noting it was a way for ballot supporters to win decriminalization. “Decriminalization of addiction is hugely important, but how you do it is equally important. Locking people up because they’re addicted to substances is not a place you want to go to, but in the moment it’s interrupting their use and it’s getting them a pathway to treatment.”

The initiative has had high-powered backers. In addition to the Drug Policy Alliance’s spending, Facebook founder and chief executive Mark Zuckerberg and his wife, Priscilla Chan, gave $500,000, according to the Oregonian. The Oregon Academy of Family Physicians, Oregon Nurses Association and the Oregon chapter of the American College of Physicians endorsed Measure 110, and singer John Legend also boosted its profile when he expressed his support on Twitter.

The editorial board of the Oregonian, the state's largest newspaper, also endorsed the measure, saying the criminal justice system’s efforts to force people with addictions into treatment is “not showing the widespread success that this state needs.”

Matthews, who appeared in a commercial for Measure 110, said the government did little to compel him into the treatment during the many times he cycled through jail in Portland. Instead, a punitive criminal justice system saddled him with a record that made it harder for him to reintegrate into society after he made up his mind to seek treatment.

“What it does is it takes the criminal element out of it,” he said of the measure. “That’s what does more harm. That’s what creates more barriers. If I didn’t catch those cases back in the day, things would have been different after I got clean. It took seven years for a lot of that to fall off. The only job I could get is day labor. Temp jobs. The dirty grimy jobs that pay anything but rent.”
 
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I hope it blows up in their faces magnificently. While you can't force someone to get clean that doesn't want to (especially not a vagrant with no support around them besides other bums giving them dope), taking away the consequences of their action doesn't do anything to help anyone but dope dealers. If they'll quit pumping money into providing needles and narcan then maybe it'll work, but I doubt it.
 
I made around 3 paragraphs.. .tldr
+1 on clearing the streets AND the lower courts of riffraf traffic!:lmao:
 
Florida man is lining up buying a bus tickets
 
While I'm generally not a fan of this states politics, what good is jail time for possession? It solves nothing and eats up tax dollars. Honestly, legalizing the sale of shrooms will probably have worse repercussions. Imagine all the middle age moms going to the hospital because they took way too much and are freaking out.
 
I found a loaded heroin needle at my local fishing hole the other day. I had my kids with me and I showed it to them and told them if they ever saw something like this to stay the fuck away from it.

Sure as shit, 20 minutes into fishing two tweakers show up. I was still standing on the bank where I found the needle, but I had it in my tackle box. I decided to show my kids what drugs do to people. We reeled in our lines like the spot sucked, and walked about 30 yards down the bank. I then told my kids to watch these guys as we continued to fish. It was bad. They were searching every rock, branch, digging stuff up. There were in a bad way.

I'm all for decriminalization of these substances, but you may find that you have to deal with them and the people that use them on a more frequent basis.

To be real, we all scream "NIMBY" but when it does affect you in some way (petty theft, vagrancy, etc) where do you draw the line? If it's legal you have absolutely no recourse for the police to do anything. Trust me, in my neighborhood which has dealt with a meth house or 3 over the past 12 years, it is very difficult even with laws, to get them to go elsewhere.

YMMV.
 
I’m hoping half the worthless shit heads that came to Colorado for legal and made a mess of the place go to Oregon now.
 
I found a loaded heroin needle at my local fishing hole the other day. I had my kids with me and I showed it to them and told them if they ever saw something like this to stay the fuck away from it.

Sure as shit, 20 minutes into fishing two tweakers show up. I was still standing on the bank where I found the needle, but I had it in my tackle box. I decided to show my kids what drugs do to people. We reeled in our lines like the spot sucked, and walked about 30 yards down the bank. I then told my kids to watch these guys as we continued to fish. It was bad. They were searching every rock, branch, digging stuff up. There were in a bad way.

I'm all for decriminalization of these substances, but you may find that you have to deal with them and the people that use them on a more frequent basis.

To be real, we all scream "NIMBY" but when it does affect you in some way (petty theft, vagrancy, etc) where do you draw the line? If it's legal you have absolutely no recourse for the police to do anything. Trust me, in my neighborhood which has dealt with a meth house or 3 over the past 12 years, it is very difficult even with laws, to get them to go elsewhere.

YMMV.

20 years ago. Lawrence MA. Fishing for Stripers, yes in Lawrence. Park the boat a few miles up from the damn. Parking lot is a total shit show. Druggies everywhere. Dad and my neighbor had been fishing there plenty of times. I got to see what the deal was. Neighbor worked a deal with the person that "ran the joint". Promised we'd bring back a fish for him if the truck was left alone. We fished for a few hours, caught some massive Stripers; like 40"+. Right at the damn. Got back, truck wasn't touched. Truck across the way was all stripped clean. Gave the guy a fish, he nodded, and off we went. Sketchy as all hell. Fortunately we always caught a fish. Hate to see what happened if we didn't. :laughing:
 
When I moved to San Diego yrs ago...

I saw shit I'd never seen before.

Didn't take me long to point my fingers at the party in question for some (read; a lot) of this countries narcotic problem.

BLAME MEXICO.

That's where this shit is coming from.
 
When I moved to San Diego yrs ago...

I saw shit I'd never seen before.

Didn't take me long to point my fingers at the party in question for some (read; a lot) of this countries narcotic problem.

BLAME MEXICO.

That's where this shit is coming from.


I'm sure it will be flooding across the border in a couple months.
 
Halfass law wont do any good.

Should have made it full tilt legal, none of this 2oz personal use shit. Arrest the distributors for tax evasion. Bring manufacturing back to the USA :flipoff2:

This, this, this, thissy thisthis.

Its not gonna work effectively... one state will just become the dope fiend capital and homelessness/poverty will quadruple as losers move into the area. It needs to be federal. End the Mexican cartels, sell it OTC in every state, allow 1 dose of narcan per citizen then you get a giant N tattoo on your forehead.
 
Again? That’s the second time this week! Linkslide beat you by three days. :flipoff2:
 
Government has no business dictating what people eat, drink, smoke, or otherwise consume in the first place. Legalize everything. Do away with free narcan. Let natural selection work its magic.
 
Government has no business dictating what people eat, drink, smoke, or otherwise consume in the first place. Legalize everything. Do away with free narcan. Let natural selection work its magic.

Nah man, everybody deserves a 2nd chance. Then a permanent life altering brand/ scar/ ink showing them every time they look in the mirror that the 2nd chance has been used up. ;)
 
Guess we didn't have enough homeless after legal weed. This is sure to get them next door.
 
Laws wont stop free will.

Education from the family unit is the key.

With or without that they either,

Will,
Wont,

Or Experiment.

The family education is what will give the highest probability of a long term positive outcome.

well said.
 
Americans proved they cannot handle alcohol and weed. Who in their right mind thinks people will do the right thing when high on hard drugs? Seriously, has anyone here even tried to converse with someone on hard drugs? NOT POSSIBLE. The paranoia for one thing is through the roof. Then people on drugs are magically going to follow laws?

So tell me, how do we stop the guy who does a hit of coke and drinks 6 beers before 9am from walking out his door, grabbing his petite neighbor, dragging her into his apartment, beat her head in with his bare hands, stomps her head off, yes off and then tries to rape her headless body? So, why does the woman have to die to give a druggie a right to do drugs?
 
Americans proved they cannot handle alcohol and weed. Who in their right mind thinks people will do the right thing when high on hard drugs? Seriously, has anyone here even tried to converse with someone on hard drugs? NOT POSSIBLE. The paranoia for one thing is through the roof. Then people on drugs are magically going to follow laws?

So tell me, how do we stop the guy who does a hit of coke and drinks 6 beers before 9am from walking out his door, grabbing his petite neighbor, dragging her into his apartment, beat her head in with his bare hands, stomps her head off, yes off and then tries to rape her headless body? So, why does the woman have to die to give a druggie a right to do drugs?

Woah!
I've never thought about doing that after a "hit of coke" and a sixer. Maybe angel dust, but not blow :flipoff2:
 
Americans proved they cannot handle alcohol and weed. Who in their right mind thinks people will do the right thing when high on hard drugs? Seriously, has anyone here even tried to converse with someone on hard drugs? NOT POSSIBLE. The paranoia for one thing is through the roof. Then people on drugs are magically going to follow laws?

So tell me, how do we stop the guy who does a hit of coke and drinks 6 beers before 9am from walking out his door, grabbing his petite neighbor, dragging her into his apartment, beat her head in with his bare hands, stomps her head off, yes off and then tries to rape her headless body? So, why does the woman have to die to give a druggie a right to do drugs?

Legal or illegal, the shit is out there... will always be out there... is only going to strengthen the black market (cartels etc). "Stop the guy" etc- its already illegal to kidnap, assault, murder, and necrophile someone's body parts.
 
Americans proved they cannot handle alcohol and weed. Who in their right mind thinks people will do the right thing when high on hard drugs? Seriously, has anyone here even tried to converse with someone on hard drugs? NOT POSSIBLE. The paranoia for one thing is through the roof. Then people on drugs are magically going to follow laws?

So tell me, how do we stop the guy who does a hit of coke and drinks 6 beers before 9am from walking out his door, grabbing his petite neighbor, dragging her into his apartment, beat her head in with his bare hands, stomps her head off, yes off and then tries to rape her headless body? So, why does the woman have to die to give a druggie a right to do drugs?

Prohibition has been working great so far....:rolleyes:
 
I was talking to a buddy that works at an alphabet agency in Colorado yesterday about this very thing. I mentioned that if they'd enact country wide castle doctrine, make my day laws and get rid of the purp or the purps family to sue for wrongful death these laws would sort shit out quick, fast and in a hurry. He fully agreed.
 
Legal or illegal, the shit is out there... will always be out there... is only going to strengthen the black market (cartels etc). "Stop the guy" etc- its already illegal to kidnap, assault, murder, and necrophile someone's body parts.


Truth, prohibition provided the same results. We have been waging a war on drugs since the 80’s, and we have lost. Maybe we need to change tactics :confused:

Nah, we will get it right next year:homer:

I think drugs are stupid, but there is no logical way to stop it. We can only hope to change public opinion against it through education.
 
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