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Calif Fires

WLDWUN

in the woods
Joined
Jun 3, 2020
Member Number
1797
Messages
238
Loc
Pollock Pines CA
looks like it is shaping up to be a bad week for fires.
Record temp all through the state, a bit of lightning yesterday started a couple

Biggest right now if Loyalton fire,
22 miles north of Truckee
36K acres and 5%

3 fires just east of the Bay Area

Lake and Ranch 2 fires down south

everyone stay safe
 
View from my house on Saturday afternoon,,,,
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20200815_184023.jpg
 
WLDWUN, since you seem to be in the know for fire "safety", what is your opinion of people starting fires and using the excuse of "it is for heat"?

A guy in our neighborhood pulled that shit yesterday and CalFire/etc wouldn't do anything. The claim is the guy's fire had flames over five feet high.
 
what is your opinion of people starting fires and using the excuse of "it is for heat"?
A guy in our neighborhood pulled that shit yesterday and CalFire/etc wouldn't do anything. The claim is the guy's fire had flames over five feet high.

I have actually called Calfire in the past on that issue.
they have stated that even under very dry conditions, that it is legal for an individual to have a fire on private property for heat/cooking reasons.
you cannot burn brush like we do in the winter, but the campfire is legal

it is the same as the are fire restrictions currently in effect in all of the National Forests in California right now. But if you are in a campground, with a camp host and a water supply is present, campfires are legal.

that said, it is not the smartest move in my opinion at this time of year.
using the excuse "for heat" is a lie. I bet he was wearing shorts and a tee shirt at the time.:rolleyes:
it was over 80 at midnight the other day here and we are at 4000 feet
 
that said, it is not the smartest move in my opinion at this time of year.
using the excuse "for heat" is a lie. I bet he was wearing shorts and a tee shirt at the time.:rolleyes:
it was over 80 at midnight the other day here and we are at 4000 feet

Are you in my neighborhood? He was shirtless:lmao:

We were a hair under 80 at 3500 last night.
 
Wow fires for heat are allowed right now down there? We technically cant even use briquettes during the burn ban:lmao:
 
Some Piece of shit exercising their right to be a fucking brain dead inconsiderate smoker started a fire between the lanes on I 70 in Glenwood Canyon last week, closing down the interstate for the last several days while the fire grows. Thats just one of a few going here right now.
 
Some Piece of shit exercising their right to be a fucking brain dead inconsiderate smoker started a fire between the lanes on I 70 in Glenwood Canyon last week, closing down the interstate for the last several days while the fire grows. Thats just one of a few going here right now.

says cause unknown here https://inciweb.nwcg.gov/incident/6942/
 
I find it interesting that Calfonia Wildfires get meantioned but not any other sates

https://www.denverpost.com/news/colorado/colorado-wildfires/

Four major wildfires are burning across Colorado, fueled by dry vegetation, drought and wind. The fires are largely uncontained and have forced some evacuations. The wildfire smoke is blanketing much of the state, with the high country in particular expected to see poor air quality Monday.

The wildfires come as federal officials this month designated 100% of Colorado as abnormally dry or under drought conditions for the first time in eight years, part of a 20-year shift toward greater aridity in the state amid climate warming.

Pine Gulch fire


Updated as of 10:12 a.m.

The Pine Gulch fire grew to 85,407 acres, or 133 square miles, Monday morning and is poised to become the third-largest wildfire in Colorado’s recorded history.

The Pine Gulch fire is close to overtaking the High Park fire, which burned 87,284 acres in Larimer County in 2012, killed one person and destroyed hundreds of homes.

Monday is a “crucial day” for firefighters, according to the Rocky Mountain Incident Management Team, because the fire has moved into drainages in several areas on the western part of the wildfire, where dry vegetation and wind create the potential for rapid spread and “significant fire behavior.” Firefighters will need to work quickly to control and suppress the blaze in those drainages.

“Today presents an opportunity to successfully influence the duration of the Pine Gulch fire,” fire officials said in a morning update.

The Pine Gulch fire is 7% contained. It was started by lightning on July 31 and is burning about 18 miles north of Grand Junction in Garfield and Mesa counties. More than 800 people are working to stop the fire’s spread.

The blaze is burning in dry vegetation in remote, rough terrain, and authorities said the dry fuels combined with drought conditions have created “extreme fire behavior with high resistance to control.”
Grizzly-Creek-fire-map-8-17.jpg
A map of the Grizzly Creek fire as reported on Aug. 17, 2020.Grizzly Creek fire


Updated as of 10:15 a.m.

The Grizzly Creek fire topped an estimated 25,000 acres, or about 40 square miles, Monday and was 0% contained.

Better weather conditions on Sunday allowed firefighters to directly engage the fire, with air support as well as direct and indirect fire lines. Firefighters worked to successfully protect structures in Bair Ranch and No Name.

Monday brings the potential for dry thunderstorms, as well as hot and dry conditions. Firefighters will continue to protect structures in Bair Ranch and No Name, and will also protect High Aspen, Spring Valley and areas to the south as needed, authorities said.

Crews on the east side of the fire are working to complete an indirect fire line from Interstate 70 to Coffee Pot Road.

I-70 remains closed in both directions between Gypsum and Glenwood Springs, with no estimated time for reopening. The fire started Aug. 10 and is burning in Glenwood Canyon. About 647 people are fighting the blaze.
Cameron-Peak-firemap-8-17.jpg
A map of the Cameron Peak fire as reported on Aug. 17, 2020.Cameron Peak fire


Updated as of 9:45 a.m.

The Cameron Peak fire hit 13,305 acres Monday morning, or about 20.8 square miles, after advancing on all fronts throughout the day Sunday.

The blaze started Thursday and is 0% contained. It’s burning in the Arapaho and Roosevelt National Forests near Cameron Pass and Chambers Lake, moving through heavy timber and rugged terrain.

Crews on Sunday completed controlled burns to the east of Long Draw Road and on Monday will carry out additional burns on the north side of Colorado 14 in order to “keep pace with a finger of fire pushing to the southwest,” if weather allows, according to an update from the Rocky Mountain Incident Management Team.

Colorado 14 remains closed from Rustic to Gould, and the Poudre Canyon is seeing heavy traffic as fire crews access the area. About 298 people are working the fire.

On Monday, fire crews will also work to remove fuels along roads west of Crystal Lakes and Red Feather Lakes.

“The distance of these preparations from the existing fire front allows times for crew to complete preparation activities before the fire reaches the area,” the update read. “Once complete, these preparations will allow for burnout operations to the west before the fire advances toward those communities.”

Firefighters are not working directly on the fire’s front because it is too dangerous, authorities said during a Sunday evening briefing. No structures have been damaged in the blaze.
williams-fork-fire-map-8-17.jpeg
A map of the Williams Fork fire as reported on Aug. 17, 2020.Williams Fork fire


Updated as of 10:49 a.m.

The Williams Fork fire grew to 6,345 acres Sunday, or about 9.9 square miles, with lighter winds and lower temperatures helping to slow the fire’s spread.

The blaze, which started Friday and is 0% contained, is burning about 7 miles southwest of Fraser in a remote area that experienced “intensive beetle kill” in the early 2000s, authorities said. The dead vegetation combined with dry conditions and winds has fueled the fire.

On Sunday, the fire moved east toward Lake Evelyn in the Byers Creek Wilderness. Firefighters focused on protecting infrastructure and hope to keep the fire east of County Road 30, south of Keyser Creek Road, north of Darling Creek and west of County Road 50.

On Monday, the Grand County Sheriff’s Office plans to launch an online interactive evacuation map so residents can check their pre-set evacuation sites if evacuations are ordered in the future. None have been ordered so far for the Fraser Valley.

The fire was caused by human activity, said Schelly Olson, Grand County public information officer. She said fire managers ruled out lightning as a cause, which means the blaze must have been sparked by humans.

Investigators haven’t yet figured out who started the fire or how, she said.



You have to love how they get "Climate Warming" into the story
 
Butte county area has a bunch of lightning caused (I know what started these fires and it wasnt lightning and the initials dont stand for Distant Early Warning)) these wild fires, I have a small rig to put out small fires and other equipment in progress of assembly.
 
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They're trying to verify a fire near us, by inskip CA. I really don't like this shit anymore.

I believe there is one at 70 and pentz also.
 
Add Napa this am

These storms are weird. It will go from dead calm, to 30mph gusts and thunder and MASSIVE lightning. A couple of my guys working in Novato(south west of Napa) had a lightning strike very close to them. They are really shaken up. It freaked them out pretty bad.
 
Did Jelf come here from the old forum? If not, anyone got his contact to invite him?
 
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This new site proves once again that you can't keep a good irate down. Thanks to WLDWUN for pinging me and pointing me here.

And speaking of fire maps, there are some issues with the data that I use for my maps. Big fires usually get a nighttime overflight that does infrared sensing. That data is analyzed by ground staff in the wee hours and the result is a KMZ file that is hosted on the NIFC FTP server. Anyone can grab those KMZ files and have their way with them.

I wrote code that reads those KMZ files and converts them into GeoJSON files which my fire map displays. This year those KMZ files are showing up with at least 4 different internal layouts. Grrrrrrrrr........

So I am redoing my KMZ ==> GeoJSON conversion code. Should be able to post some fire maps here in a day or so.
 
You rock
I was a 5 min walk from the napa "soda" fire.
it it raining ash in 80+* weather today...
 
Now Ya'll remember this!
Here in the prk you need't have a good reason to be an idiot!
It is part of the mentality!
Just like during a fire ban on the trail, I hear warming fires are ok(in 75 deg weather!?) RIGHT!
Had chinooks and other high output birds overheard latley, I'm 1\4 mile from napas ground zero...
Big brothers spooked AGAIN!
 
This new site proves once again that you can't keep a good irate down. Thanks to WLDWUN for pinging me and pointing me here.

And speaking of fire maps, there are some issues with the data that I use for my maps. Big fires usually get a nighttime overflight that does infrared sensing. That data is analyzed by ground staff in the wee hours and the result is a KMZ file that is hosted on the NIFC FTP server. Anyone can grab those KMZ files and have their way with them.

I wrote code that reads those KMZ files and converts them into GeoJSON files which my fire map displays. This year those KMZ files are showing up with at least 4 different internal layouts. Grrrrrrrrr........

So I am redoing my KMZ ==> GeoJSON conversion code. Should be able to post some fire maps here in a day or so.

Glad to see you make it here, buddy.

You are a literal lifeline for us that live in the wildfire zones in the hill country. Thank you for doing what you do, you're a hero to many of us.
 
If you zoom out any of the wildland fire maps I produce then you will always see all the current satellite hotspot data. That data is automatically updated several times per day. MODIS satellites = red triangle. VIIRS satellites = orange square.

Caution! Satellite hotspot data is *always* several hours old when you see it on a map and locations are approximate. This is because it takes NASA about 3 hours to process the raw data before it can appear on a map. For that reason, you should never rely on a satellite hotspot map to ignore an order to evacuate!

To make your own custom map link, zoom in on an area or click Menu ==> Search. Turn on the overlay layers you want. Then click Menu ==> Link to this map. The link you see will replicate the map on your screen.

To learn how to turn other overlay layers on/off, to find out the importance of the ‘top’ layer and otherwise get the most benefit from the map, please read the “Map tips”. That link is in the upper left corner of each map.

For larger fires I will post a zoomed in map that also shows the fire perimeter as determined by an infrared overflight. While a big fire is cranking I usually get those perimeter maps updated by 6am. But currently I am not posting perimeter maps while I work on the code.

Open GISsurfer map:
https://mappingsupport.com/p2/gissu...2/special_maps/disaster/USA_wildland_fire.txt

08_18_2020 usa.jpg - Click image for larger version  Name:	08_18_2020 usa.jpg Views:	20 Size:	507.1 KB ID:	106144
 
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Today started out interesting.

I have to leave at 245 am for work. I'm about 5 mins from the house, the road goes along the edge of a canyon. I happen to look kinda to the left as I make a left hand curve and see a small fire up the canyon. FUCK, that looks kinda close.

Long story short, I call it in, sheriffs and fire show up. We find another vantage point and it looks like it's a little further away than I thought.

Ended up driving all around and finding it was further than I first thought, but not as far as we thought later. About 4-5 miles from my house. Luckily it's very slow rate of spread and they have quite a bit of response on it.
 
Picture harryjohnson sent me looking at rooster831s property

It looks like they finally have a perimeter for that fire. Not looking good for my favorite mountain biking spot. (red is fire, green is where I like to ride)


2020-08-18 08_15_34-Google Earth Pro.png


https://data-nifc.opendata.arcgis.c...data?geometry=-121.771,36.542,-121.510,36.590



...and for all the people who like to bag on California's lack of thinning contributing to fires, that's really not the case here. There's no forest to thin, mostly grass and it gets grazed pretty hard:
IMG_20200727_162341.jpg
 
...and for all the people who like to bag on California's lack of thinning contributing to fires, that's really not the case here. There's no forest to thin, mostly grass and it gets grazed pretty hard:

Even the areas that need thinning, I really only helps for a very short time before either brush takes over, or the new planted trees sprout up. All the area that burned in 2018 and hasn't been touched is already 6-8' of brush.

The only thing that really helps, is either a slow moving fire that only takes out the under brush and leaves the canopy, or careful thinning with the same effect.

We get almost double the rain fall of Seattle in 3-4 months. Then 8-9 months of dry hot weather. Seems like the perfect recipe for fires. Then add all the people, vehicles, utilities everywhere and the chance of ignition is very high.
 
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