What's new

WWII Marine "Nothing I done bothered me"

I watch a ton of the WW2 veteran vids, like 3 a day. I have yet to see one who has complained of PTSD, some will talk of nightmares and alcohol addiction after their service but that's about it. I have also heard many when asked the question talk about sucking it up and getting on with life. Don't get me wrong I do believe PTSD is a very real thing and I would bet these guys had their share of it but they dealt with it without labeling themselves or crying about it.

Truly the greatest generation.:usa::usa::usa:

On the same token I also believe PTSD is one of the most misused excuses for a lot of the non service civilians alive today. For fucks sake my nephews girl friend has been diagnosed with it. She has less than 0 reason to have it.:mad3:
 
On the same token I also believe PTSD is one of the most misused excuses for a lot of the non service civilians alive today. For fucks sake my nephews girl friend has been diagnosed with it. She has less than 0 reason to have it.:mad3:

I dated a woman that was on xanex . Found out she had been on them and other scripes for years due to PTSD from a highschool breakup. Fun to fuck. Not much else.
 
I watch a ton of the WW2 veteran vids, like 3 a day. I have yet to see one who has complained of PTSD, some will talk of nightmares and alcohol addiction after their service but that's about it. I have also heard many when asked the question talk about sucking it up and getting on with life. Don't get me wrong I do believe PTSD is a very real thing and I would bet these guys had their share of it but they dealt with it without labeling themselves or crying about it.

They had PTSD way back when. But they called it "shell shock" or "combat stress disorder". If you ended up with it, your buddies chastised you for being a pussy. It was a different time.
 
They had PTSD way back when. But they called it "shell shock" or "combat stress disorder". If you ended up with it, your buddies chastised you for being a pussy. It was a different time.

There was a dozen or so people executed in WWI for dereliction of duty or desertion, a good portion of them were "posthumously diagnosed" with PTSD. They freaked out and just didn't do what they were supposed to, and the only logical explanation at the time was just going AWOL or whatever.
 
I watch a ton of the WW2 veteran vids, like 3 a day. I have yet to see one who has complained of PTSD, some will talk of nightmares and alcohol addiction after their service but that's about it.

Keep in mind: those being interviewed within the last decade are all folks who adjusted one way or another. I agree with everything you wrote, but must note that the ones who couldn't get over it are long gone.

Had an old family friend who'd been a tail gunner in bombers over Germany - salt of the earth, truly a great guy & example for future generations. On the rare occasions we talked about his WWII service, he had deep pain 50 years later like it was yesterday. Most days, he just didn't think about it, but he never got over killing innocent civilians as collateral damage.

I think the biggest difference is that there was no option but to suck it up back then. Today's pussification is encouraged if not celebrated, and that's fawkin' sad.
 
Men like this are why people live pampered lives for decades. Snowflakes crying about being misgendered or 'silence is violence" wouldn't make a pimple on his ass.

He seems to have fared much better than some who came out of it with PTSD.


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2vSf8oMyaN0

And they did a great job raising the generation of retards that created the "snowflakes", so great job there... :stirthepot:
 
Men like this are why people live pampered lives for decades. Snowflakes crying about being misgendered or 'silence is violence" wouldn't make a pimple on his ass.

He seems to have fared much better than some who came out of it with PTSD.


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2vSf8oMyaN0

Those "silence is violence" snowflakes must be the most peaceful people on the planet, because they never shut the fuck up.
 
All of my fathers cronnies (ww2 vintage MEN) would rather kick dirt than WHINE about the time in grade...
One of my ridin bud's girl "has ptsd" MY AZZ
 
I just started watching Band of Brothers again the other day. They are the greatest generation!
 
I worked with a Nam vet whom had PTSD and alcoholism. Both were bad. Like really really bad.
Super nice guy. Smart as can be.
But balloons popping sent him flying under a desk, and he'd stay there for an hour or better. In some ways, my naivety thought it was funny at the time, but in hindsight I felt sorrow. Guy would get blackout drunk and disappear from work for days at a time, sometimes up to a week. Eventually we parted ways with him. Heard he killed himself but don't know if that's factual, although I suspect it was.
 
Ww2 vets are portrayed as keeping it all inside. Vietnam vets are crazed drug addicts....The Mideastern Vets are protrayed by some of you as snowflakes?
How would the story play out if Ww2 has 24/7 news coverage and the Internet?
Some of you here may have seen actual combat situations. If not, don't talk about shit that you have no experience with....
 
i listen to the Jocko podcast regularly and he talks about how the way we fight wars now was very different that in the past. main thing is that they were deployed until the job was done, so that could be years. also that when they returned they floated back on a ship for 2-4weeks. some of the guys hes had on go from being in theatre to the civilian world in less than 3 days. no time to process what has happened.
 
Which generation raised the snowflakes? It wasn't us boomers :flipoff2::stirthepot:

Sure it was! Both my parents are boomers, my wifes parents are boomers and we both fall into the millennials aka the snowflakes you tards are always crying about!:flipoff2:

​​​​​​
 
Sure it was! Both my parents are boomers, my wifes parents are boomers and we both fall into the millennials aka the snowflakes you tards are always crying about!:flipoff2:

​​​​​​

Thank god I didn't raise no snowflakes! :flipoff2:
 
Both Grandfathers were in WWII, I didn't know them well enough to comment on PTSD. One Granddad lived life as usual. The other smoked a pack of lucky strikes daily and drank like a fish. The party G-Pa lived into his late 80's. The other died when I was 6 at 57 from a heart attack.

My dad is a Vietnam vet, as well as all my moms brothers (there's only one left now). My dad had a rough time of it when he got back... drinking, some drugs and mental issues. Took him a while to sort it out. One uncle went insane and ended up living in the sticks and heavy drug use. The other uncle died and my Uncle Gary lived a fairly normal life, but it always affected him even to this day. Call it whatever you like, PTSD, tough times, or any other name. It definitely takes a toll. My eyes and couple other issues prevented me from joining the Army at 18, and in a way I am glad it worked out that way.
 
My dad was a German soldier. He was 16 in 1942. It affected him the rest of his life, smoked and drank too much. Died at 57. He said to me once, that if they ever drafted me, he wouldn't let me go. Not sure how he would have stopped it, but he meant it.
 
Truly the greatest generation.:usa::usa::usa:

Absolutely. In 1944 heroism was being on the front lines on Omaha beach. In 2021 heroism is risking getting the flu as a public school teacher after returning to work after a year vacation.
 
i listen to the Jocko podcast regularly and he talks about how the way we fight wars now was very different that in the past. main thing is that they were deployed until the job was done, so that could be years. also that when they returned they floated back on a ship for 2-4weeks. some of the guys hes had on go from being in theatre to the civilian world in less than 3 days. no time to process what has happened.

I've often wondered if that slow boat ride home from the combat zone with a bunch of fellow vets who shared the same experience didn't help a lot of them to decompress and work it out. Of course they had the mindset too that it was a nasty job that had to be done and when it was done they were going to get on with their lives.
 
The slow boat home and drinking like a fish at the VFW was how a lot of them handled it.
 
The slow boat home and drinking like a fish at the VFW was how a lot of them handled it.

Imagine arresting someone who waded and fought ashore at Tinian for drunk driving lol

In the 50s 60s and 70s, nobody bothered a WWII vet who drank at lunch every day. Cops didn't arrest guys leaving the VFW parking lot. Men came home from work and commenced drinking, the only interaction with Dad was to get beaten or at least spoken to sternly. Dad's only did discipline.

Yeah they all had PTSD which is a perfectly functional condition in a society that doesn't have a $500 Billion/yr prison/diversion/rehab/court economy. In the 1950s, not every faggot celebrity was coming out about how recovered they are and how stopping [X] changed their life etc etc.
 
Just finished the autobiography of Robin Olds, a WWII and Vietnam fighter pilot ace. He wrote that while in England (WWII), one of his tent mates often cried and screamed in his sleep. Olds thought he was a coward. Yet the man went on every mission he was assigned and never tried to avoid his duty. Olds wrote that years later he realized that the guy (who was later shot down on a mission over France) was one of the bravest people he knew.

Great book: https://www.amazon.com/Fighter-Pilot-Memoirs-Legendary-Robin/dp/0312569513?tag=91812054244-20
 
As an Amazon Associate we earn from qualifying purchases.
Ww2 vets are portrayed as keeping it all inside. Vietnam vets are crazed drug addicts....The Mideastern Vets are protrayed by some of you as snowflakes?
How would the story play out if Ww2 has 24/7 news coverage and the Internet?
Some of you here may have seen actual combat situations. If not, don't talk about shit that you have no experience with....

I'm sure there were plenty of 40-something drunks, broken people who died in the decades following WWII, but "popular culture" chose not to put a spotlight on them. As someone said on this thread, the 98 year old vet you speak with today is probably someone who was able to successfully cope with those experiences in some way or another.
 
Imagine arresting someone who waded and fought ashore at Tinian for drunk driving lol

In the 50s 60s and 70s, nobody bothered a WWII vet who drank at lunch every day. Cops didn't arrest guys leaving the VFW parking lot. Men came home from work and commenced drinking, the only interaction with Dad was to get beaten or at least spoken to sternly. Dad's only did discipline.

Yeah they all had PTSD which is a perfectly functional condition in a society that doesn't have a $500 Billion/yr prison/diversion/rehab/court economy. In the 1950s, not every faggot celebrity was coming out about how recovered they are and how stopping [X] changed their life etc etc.

Am I correct in remembering that, unlike Vietnam or the various sandbox operations, when somebody got on the ship in WWII, they either came back AFTER V-E or V-J day, or not at all? Leaving home as an 18 year old and coming back as a 22 year old who has seen nothing but war in the interim has to have a pretty major effect on a guy..
 
Imagine arresting someone who waded and fought ashore at Tinian for drunk driving lol

In the 50s 60s and 70s, nobody bothered a WWII vet who drank at lunch every day. Cops didn't arrest guys leaving the VFW parking lot. Men came home from work and commenced drinking, the only interaction with Dad was to get beaten or at least spoken to sternly. Dad's only did discipline.

Yeah they all had PTSD which is a perfectly functional condition in a society that doesn't have a $500 Billion/yr prison/diversion/rehab/court economy. In the 1950s, not every faggot celebrity was coming out about how recovered they are and how stopping [X] changed their life etc etc.

Relentless media has dramatically changes, some say, ruined the way the military fights and takes care of it's own. Certainly Cronkite crying on TV lost the US the Vietnam war. War is hell and the only way to make some foes capitulate was to kill them or break their will/civilization. That is the ugly truth. Cutting slack for returned Vets for what WE have asked them to do in our name is how it should be.

The Vets that were bothered by their service drank themselves to an early grave or ended themselves with risky behavior or a bullet. One of the flag raisers at Iwo chose the former after his 28 days on the Island and subsequent War Bonds tours...

I consider myself very lucky that my Dad came home from 2 tours in Vietnam whole and was able to reintegrate into society to have a long and productive career. That is not the case for many.
 
Ww2 vets are portrayed as keeping it all inside. Vietnam vets are crazed drug addicts....The Mideastern Vets are protrayed by some of you as snowflakes?
How would the story play out if Ww2 has 24/7 news coverage and the Internet?
Some of you here may have seen actual combat situations. If not, don't talk about shit that you have no experience with....

Hmmmm, nah. Plenty of people have written memoirs so that they can specifically be read, talked about, and digested by people who haven't been in combat.
 
Hmmmm, nah. Plenty of people have written memoirs so that they can specifically be read, talked about, and digested by people who haven't been in combat.

So you can experience the actual horror of combat while sitting in your easy chair?
 
Gen. Patton approached a soldier in a hospital who was complaining about the shelling & that his nerves couldn't take it. So, the big guy Patton gives him an open hand smack & called him a coward.


Anybody here the son/grandson of the crybaby :flipoff2:
 
Top Back Refresh