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Wood stove pipe/chimney tech

bgaidan

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Trying to unfuck a few things from the PO around the property. He wasn't a total hack, but I can tell he wasn't afraid to tackle projects he didn't know much about....and do them wrong. :laughing: Old dude probably wasn't much for google or how-to videos.

I have this wood furnace thing in the shop. Pretty sure it's almost new and he only lit it a couple times. It's got a blower that right now just blows straight up the top....I'll eventually get a little duct made that diverts that 3 ways to the sides and front. But I'm pretty sure the pipe needs to be addressed first.

I tried to light it a couple weeks ago. I got a decent draft on it at first and got it cooking, when I choked it down a bit it started dumping smoke in to the shop. It got bad enough that I eventually had to open the doors and vent it out. It was bleeding back through the dampers and even around the joints in the pipe.

I haven't had a woodstove since the house I grew up in and I'm a little rusty so it's possible I fucked up the dampers or something, but I'm also thinking this pipe is not right at all. Does it even look like chimney pipe to you? I need to pull a joint apart, but it almost looks like hvac duct....which would explain the leaking.

And then on the outside, I'm thinking I really need to 90 it up and get it over the roof. I'm thinking it may have just ben a little windy and the way its set up was just blowing the smoke back in.
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I agree. That pipe ain't right. Also it'll draft a lot better if you take it straight out the roof.

Edit: I would go straight up rather than what's there or move it closer to the wall and eliminate some of that long horizontal run.
 
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You're on the right track. I don't like wall pipes like that, but to go through the roof you're gonna need triple wall.
I'd get the correct pipe, a t clean out, and send it up to over the roof. May need to protect it from snow coming off the roof depending on your location.
 
Go straight up if you can. The stove in our house had a section of single wall coming out of the stove before it transitioned to triple wall, which made it easy to pull apart and run a brush through.
 
I agree. That pipe ain't right. Also it'll draft a lot better if you take it straight out the roof.

Edit: I would go straight up rather than what's there or move it closer to the wall and eliminate some of that long horizontal run.

Really not a fan of going through the roof on this. Moving it closer to the wall should be do-able, assuming it's not already at some minimum clear distance.



You're on the right track. I don't like wall pipes like that, but to go through the roof you're gonna need triple wall.
I'd get the correct pipe, a t clean out, and send it up to over the roof. May need to protect it from snow coming off the roof depending on your location.

What's the t clean out and where does it go? At the bottom of the vertical run outside?



I'm assuming that there's no such thing as galvanized chimney pipe and this is indeed hvac duct. Is black pipe the right thing to use here - inside and out? Assuming I don't need insulated pipe or anything special?
 
I agree on the straight up. Both of my stoves are run vertically, they draft well and are very easy to clean and inspect. The insulated stainless is they way to go but its pricey. I look at it this way a flue fire will quickly negate any extra cost of the more expensive pipe.
 
Look at pipe boot express they have all of the necessary boots and sealers if you do go through the roof.
 
Straight up if possible.

If not, put a T on the outside of the wall with a cleanout on bottom. Get the top of the chimney as high as you can - over the peak if possible.

I'd move that fucker so it's not in the middle of the floor. Put in a radiant shield (piece of 20ga plate) on the wall behind it with some standoffs. Little bit of ducting to point the air around.

If you're moving the exit point, put in triple wall like mentioned. If you're not, don't. It *shouldn't* kill you or burn anything down the way it's set up now. :laughing:
 
Fuuuu.....

I need to check and see what the pipe that's there really is. They apparently DO make galvanized double/triple wall pipe, but I doubt that's what I have.

Looks like this will be a $1k+ venture. :eek:
 
Looks like a tractor supply furnace. my friend got one to heat a greenhouse. if i remember right it has a door slider on top and a spin type vent on the bottom door below the firebox and shaker grate. the small one has a single blower and the big one has duel blowers.

I have found that you need a good coal bed of a few inches before you start to dampen it down. logs smoke out a lot if you just throw it in and dampen it without heat from an established bed. you also need a dampener on the flue. tractor supply should have them, maybe lowes. it’s just a round flap on the inside of the pipe with a metal dowel through it and the pipe you open and close it by twisting it. it helps hold the heat down to the fire and keeps it from getting cold and smoking out your shop when you start cutting off the air. again you need a good coal bed before you start dampening things down

Edit: and yes the flue sucks, plenty of good suggestions above
 
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Straight up if possible.

If not, put a T on the outside of the wall with a cleanout on bottom. Get the top of the chimney as high as you can - over the peak if possible.

I'd move that fucker so it's not in the middle of the floor. Put in a radiant shield (piece of 20ga plate) on the wall behind it with some standoffs. Little bit of ducting to point the air around.

If you're moving the exit point, put in triple wall like mentioned. If you're not, don't. It *shouldn't* kill you or burn anything down the way it's set up now. :laughing:


This is what I would do.

Slide it back to the wall, shorten your horizontal run. Use a T on the exterior with a length of pipe to run up over the peak. Cap the bottom of the T, but use screws so it can be removed when you clean out the smokestack. Nothing wrong with running horizontal for a bit as long as you have some vertical for a draft pipe. Dad's woodstove is setup this way and has run trouble free for the last decade.

Also, run an elbow on your hot air duct to force the clean air out into the garage. It will work the same as if you have it out in the middle of the garage space.
 
Looks like a tractor supply furnace. my friend got one to heat a greenhouse. if i remember right it has a door slider on top and a spin type vent on the bottom door below the firebox and shaker grate. the small one has a single blower and the big one has duel blowers.

I have found that you need a good coal bed of a few inches before you start to dampen it down. logs smoke out a lot if you just throw it in and dampen it without heat from an established bed. you also need a dampener on the flue. tractor supply should have them, maybe lowes. it’s just a round flap on the inside of the pipe with a metal dowel through it and the pipe you open and close it by twisting it. it helps hold the heat down to the fire and keeps it from getting cold and smoking out your shop when you start cutting off the air. again you need a good coal bed before you start dampening things down

Edit: and yes the flue sucks, plenty of good suggestions above

You might be right. I have the manual at home, but it looks like it's a Clayton by US Stove. Discontinued. Looks like the fucker was upwards of $3k new though. :eek:

This one has the dual blowers in back.

It's got 2 spin dampers. There's also what I believe is a sliding damper at the flue exit on top.

Apparently there's also a blower you can put in place of the top spin damper (note the 110 outlet next to it). These can be used for wood or coal so maybe that blower is for coal only.


61987eYEmjL._AC_SL1000_.jpg
 
This is what I would do.

Slide it back to the wall, shorten your horizontal run. Use a T on the exterior with a length of pipe to run up over the peak. Cap the bottom of the T, but use screws so it can be removed when you clean out the smokestack. Nothing wrong with running horizontal for a bit as long as you have some vertical for a draft pipe. Dad's woodstove is setup this way and has run trouble free for the last decade.

Also, run an elbow on your hot air duct to force the clean air out into the garage. It will work the same as if you have it out in the middle of the garage space.

I think this is going to be my first approach. I'd really rather not cut a hole in the roof. Worst case, I'll have enough pipe to redo it later.

I plan to have a little piece of duct made up that will divert the exit air to the sides and front. If I get really motivated, I may run a length of duct over to the climate controlled side of the shop to supplement the heat pump over there.
 
yes you need a vertical pipe in the back, and it is suppose to be 2' above the higest point 10' away.
this will give you the best draft.
 
Eeek. Might be a tall bitch if I have to get it 2' above the peak. It's basically like the pipe on the left in that pic, except coming up the side of the building instead of the roof. It'd probably need to be 10'+ above the edge of the roof.
 
You might be right. I have the manual at home, but it looks like it's a Clayton by US Stove. Discontinued. Looks like the fucker was upwards of $3k new though. :eek:

This one has the dual blowers in back.

It's got 2 spin dampers. There's also what I believe is a sliding damper at the flue exit on top.

Apparently there's also a blower you can put in place of the top spin damper (note the 110 outlet next to it). These can be used for wood or coal so maybe that blower is for coal only.



so it’s the stove that tractor supply kinda copied. theirs didn’t have a flue dampener, or the power plug and they moved the top air control to the door as a slider. my friend got the smaller version knockoff. after we had a good fire and bed established we would run with the flue pipe dampener 3/4 closed, bottom air 2-3 turns from closed and top was halfway slide open. later he started anthracite/coal and ran it with the flue almost closed, top air closed, and bottom air about the same, maybe 4 turns. it’s not really setup for coal though, coal stoves have vertical firebox walls where his was shaped like a valley. it also leaked too much air above the fire. a proper coal stove can go 12+ hours, he could never get more than 4 unless he got it above 900+ degrees before dampening it. the paint on the magnetic stove thermometer changed got browner but surprisingly came back kinda. I’ll be surprised if he didn’t burn the thing down by now.
 
I built some stainless standoff brackets to hold it secure and straight. I hate the double 45 at the roof overhang most folks do so its set out further than usual to clear.

20210202_093339.jpg


20210202_093339.jpg
 
galvanized is fine, it'll probably last you 5 years before it rusts through whereas the black painted will maybe go 8

you need 18" of clearance to anything combustible with single wall, 6-8" with double wall, and 2" with proper class-A
so with the wall girts where they are you should technically have double wall at the very least, though I do like the look of that clay pipe, probably doing about as well insulating the radiated heat as class A would.

ETA: and everyone is right, you gotta go up over the roof, probably 5' up over the edge would be fine. If you do poke it through the roof like you should, watch several videos on how to do it, as there are plenty of ways people do it with corrugated steel and the right answer is pretty obvious when you see it
 
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It’s too much work to mess with...

can I pick it up on Saturday? :flipoff2:
 
https://www.lowes.com/pd/SuperVent-1...E&gclsrc=aw.ds

If you have a Lowes near you this stuff is priced decent last I checked, and they are open all the time if you need more or different lengths. It made by the Selkirk metalbestos company. Looks damn near identical ,but the twist lock threads are different pitch so can't mix the 2 in case you happen to find a deal on some on market place.
 
I did not read all the replies, that said...
3 choices in order if best first.
1 straight up with a 2\10 standoff and good arrester.
2 put a 90 outside and run the pipe(insulated and dump tee at 90*) up past roofline with a 2\10 standoff.
3 a direct vent wall termination
2\10 = 2' over any obstruction within 10' of penetration.
 
You really need to get that up above the roofline. Preferably 3' over the peak, but definitely up over the edge. HTF can someone thing running it straight out of the back is a good idea?

That stainless double wall is good stuff and you can mount it with a cleanout at the bottom.
 
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