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Wood carport build

Snoop dogg

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Hi...thread title says build but i probably wont post pictures lol.

I am looking to build a carport for my camper, and i am definitely not an experienced carpenter. Mostly looking for common knowledge advice.

Length of carport :. 28'
Span: 10'
Outside width of posts : 10' 8"
Height of posts:. 10'-12'. Depending on the pier height

Roof 2/12 pitch...metal corrugated.

It will be a pole barn type build. Posts on concreted piers, un level surface the camper is on. I need the carport for 2 years and its on my buddys property, so not gonna pour a pad...maybe gravel pad next year.

Couple questions

Can i get away with the 12x12 piers with simpson ties, and not have to pour piers 2ft down? Thinking about what kind of lift an open structure like this gets. The camper will be there so its kind of a wind break??

I live in portland,or not used to anything much over 20mph but labor day we had a historic wind storm for us that ignited this match box. Winds easy 40mph. That made me re think the free standing piers and lean towards poured piers.

I originally planned for 4x4 posts, a bottom 2x4 footer and a header 2x6. Should i use two 2x6 headers to sandwich the 4x4 posts or will one header on the outside of the posts the length of the wall be fine? Ill be using 4x4 gussets/45* kickers from the posts to the header.

For wall rafters i *intended to use 2x4 24" oc and roof rafter trusses 48" oc over the 4x4 posts.

2x4 perlins?? Whatever theyre called on the trusses so i can screw the roofing to it.

The backside of the carport will have a big X to keep any yawing back there.


Mostly concerned with lift. I can always add braces, it seems like a simple structure to me but just dont have the common knowledge a day to day carpenter has.

Ive done a lot of google fu and youtube for this project, i am a DIY er...just need a little guidance if im going the right route.

​​
 
Go read up on terminology please...
Now lemme go decipher yer question!


a free standing \set pier and Simpson's a waste of time (gunna fly the #60 block and frame away anynow.)

Perhaps draw a sketch?

24 oc studs are ok.
48 oc rafters aint
2\12 pitch? I hope ya don't get NO snow and the rainfall is lightweight! (Read downpour colapsing the lid).

back to first line, lift issue's are only stopped by anchorage!
You need an pip pier\caison\foundation pick one.

My .02
You need way more framing.
You can do 2x4 skip sheathing ontop of rafters... (1x4 may work in low wind))
you stated the rear will get an "x" brace... Good practice, at least do an let in brace on the long sides if not siding this thing.
 
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Ive done a sketch, maybe ill scan it.

Since its not a house, and no second story...the "walls" will have 4x4 posts 48" oc. Ill pour piers 2ft below grade (figure out how much pier will be above grade, stick simpson brackets in the concrete. For each post.

Not sure what the confusion on header or footer is. Since its not a house wall that will have drywall. My header will be a 2x6 or a 2x8 screwed to the outside of the posts. This is what the lower rafters 24" oc will be sitting on with hurricane ties as well as the trusses.

And same for the bottom of the wall the footer will be screwed to the outside. There will be 45's, gussets, supports coming off the 4x4s...whatever you want to call them. Metal industry, roofing industry, framing...whatever you want to call them. As a roofer i hear 10 different types of cold process called "poo". Lol

As far as the metal roof goes, im in portland...it rains a lot. How do you forsee water pooling up on a metal roof with a 2/12...yea its low slope but its not a big roof. We rarely get hard rain mostly just perpetual light rain. There wont be any ponding water lol. We barely get snow.

Putting the trusses at 24" oc wont be a problem instead of 48" oc, and understand that could be prefered for heavy rain. When i run my group of 2x4s( not sure what you call those , everyone i know and google calls them perlins)along the roof rafters so i can screw my roofing down...that will span the 48" oc truss the length of the roof paneling preventing sagging is what i was hoping or is it general consesus to put it all at 24"oc? Was trying to cut down on the # of trusses ill build by going 48" oc with 2x4 rafters 24" oc.


Thanks for your input!


​​​​​​
 
Go read up on terminology please...
Now lemme go decipher yer question!


a free standing \set pier and Simpson's a waste of time (gunna fly the #60 block and frame away anynow.)

Perhaps draw a sketch?

24 oc studs are ok.

My .02
You need way more framing.
You can do 2x4 skip sheathing ontop of rafters... (1x4 may work in low wind))
you stated the rear will get an "x" brace... Good practice, at least do an let in brace on the long sides if not siding this thing.


So your thinking is my 4x4 posts 48" oc on poured piers, with the 2x6 or 2x8 header and footer...plus the 45* 4x4 supports off each post still needs more framing? Like a 2x4 half way between each 4x4s??

On my first sketch i had a 2x4 running from the bottom of the corner post to the middle top of the header at 14' run, and same from the other corner post. Like this /\. And that would get lagged to each 4x4 post. But i thought well...the 45* 4x4 supports will help with yawing and might look better than long 2x4s from the lower end of the corner post to the top middle of the header.


Thanks again!!
 
Actually
My response was directed at the unintelligible nomenclature you used.
You boys from the pnw TAWLK funny....:flipoff2:
You are making a much better representation of a pole barn in the second response.

As a "roofer" you should " have this" as the kids say.
Jabs aside' post up your plan, that's easier to interpret.
4' oc posts work!
A single 2x lets call it a top "girder" is ok with Simpson doing the work.

Girts top n bottom will help it look good and tighten up the trusses.

​​​​​​does "yawing" = racking or twisting?

The knee bracing at the top is fine, an x in the center span will lock it up tight, but your /\ frame will help out just less so.
 
Not worried about the execution, i can build plumb and square. I do more metal fab and shit than any other trade for hobby, and i use framing tools often in my field of work so im a certified hack lol.
Im a low slope/commercial roofer if that tells you anything lol, but most of my hours are equipment maintenance and fab work.

My concern is for my lack of common framing knowledge around loads etc

So your "girts" is what i refer to as header and footer. I hear people call them beams for the top, ive heard top plate and bottom plate...sill etc. Between industry buddies down to craigslist hacks, youtube...heard it all.

Yep yawing is what youre thinking. I lived in the south for 27 years btw :flipoff2:

Ill post my plans later tonight
 
Cool beans
fwiw pole barn nomenclature is a land un to it's own!

We can chew on sizing later an 2x10-12 "header is best.
A 4x4-6 beam\girder on top of posts would rock.
 
Enjoy! Lol. I totally feel im overthinking it...but im enjoying some drawing too :homer:

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If i can get away with just the corners being poured concrete 2ft down that would be great, and use the free standing piers with a bottom plate/footer etc for all 5 posts between the end posts. You think 4 corners will provide enough anchor? I think so but what do i know, i shclep hot asphalt and make a mess!! :homer:
 
Round 2 (pic #5) is stronger, I'd run with that or do the sandwich with 2x6-8.
if the sandwich is cheaper (temp building right?) Do that.

Pic 5 is 24' long correct?
I would like to see one center pier for anchorage, 4 most likely will work if them 40mph gusts don't show up.

The single 2x4 won't carry the ​​load, think about a gable end lookout when you get out on the end vs a 2x6...
you could double carriage bolt a single 2x10 or stagger stitch em and be good.


Make a punch list of what I missed if ya want.
 
The single 2x4 won't carry the ​​load, think about a gable end lookout when you get out on the end vs a 2x6...
you could double carriage bolt a single 2x10 or stagger stitch em and be good.

can you elaborate on the double carriage bolt 2x10? edit* if you are referring to that for the bottom girter...gotcha.



So for the roof trusses, the span of 10' could be handled with a 2x6 at minimum and 2x4 upper rafters? Make plywood plates to make that truss.

The first picture was my first scribbles of thoughts, I kind of like that design because I can just run 2x6's from the highpoint of the roof down to the low point. Then for my little awning built off it, run 2x6s for some pitch. BTW ...i live in the camper! So whether i do a gable roof over my camper, and lean to roof over the "patio" OR like in the first picture....it sounds like 2x6 for a 10' rafter span is bare minimum.

Having the little covered "patio" built onto the carport makes it nice during the rainy season to keep my shit dry and from tracking in mud etc. I can also get cabin fever living the tiny life, so being able to sit outside while raining and not use my retractable awning is a must.

cost is definitely a factor, but i have a fair amount of good lumber waiting to be used too. Its two years for me, maybe shorter...but my buddy will still have the place and he will be able to use it for some outside storage. It will be a nice "gift" to him.:lmao:

I have thrown up most of my thoughts, notes, versions at ya...and they are all over the place. preciate you wading through the muck
 
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For a 10' span the bottom chord can be 2x4, if you are doing a solid cdx web yer good.
Just make a notch at the bottom center for a 2x chord tie(runs the length of lid on top of the trusses to help them stay straight) then using the perlins (skip sheathing) at the top to plumb and space the individual trusses.

awning detail time...
In post 8, first pic (green\red) is a little confusing, this shows a single pitch shed roof, on right and another under it on left as the pattio ?yes?
but the penciled in bit is how you want to do it I believe!


edit the following is out of sequence
double carriage bolt detail,
as the 2x10 at the top that supports the trusses (could be bottom girt also) goes onto\across the posts you put 2 bolts at 12\6 oclock. Stitching would be one bolt at the top \center of 2 x10 of post #1 and on the bottom of post #2 top of post #3.
Edit above is out of sequence

That will work fine,this allows the wind a path thru the underside.
For grins, alternatively you could run the main roof out (think big eaves) and support it as drawn, less work but more wind issue's this way.
Just think of prevailing wind direction so main shelters the under mounted section.
 
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awning detail time...
In post 8, first pic (green\red) is a little confusing, this shows a single pitch shed roof, on right and another under it on left as the pattio ?yes?
but the penciled in bit is how you want to do it I believe!

The sketches with marker are my first thoughts, i have a hard time visualising....so ill draw it out.

Everything in pencil is after this thread start.

You were able to decipher it!

The first sketch design seemed easier regarding the roof, but looks a little hacky lol.

Thanks for the walk through, it all makes sense. First up will be getting through gravel and dirt for the piers. Unfortunately i wont be able to pur the concrete till 10/3.
 
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Finally getting to some time on this. Learned and still learning about timber framing.

Ended up doing 6x6s. And will carriage bolt my trusses to the posts

Holes are dug, i tested setting one post on sunday to get my bearings on the best way to plumb them. Wasnt too bad. Went with 16', probably wouldve been fine witt 14' posts cut down but i just overcompensated knowing my math skills lol.


Its been damp, overcast etc...typical PNW. BUT I am not getting standing water in my holes, the walls of the holes look damp though. Its a clay fill, with 3" of hard packed gravel on top. Im pretty stoked the fill seems nice and compact, should be a good footing.

My question is, should i use a sonotube or something similar in these damp conditions and pour into that, backfill my post holes? OR will i be fine as long as there is no standing water?

I have 2" of gravel in my post holes, 36" deep. There is like 1 or 2 days forecasted no rain for the next two weeks, and ill have my posts plumbed and braced ready to go for concrete. Does the soil need to dry out before the pour?

Today seemed like a day i could have poured, it was damp...drizzly, no sitting water in hole though. But it the next 12 hours its supposed to have steady rain so i decided not to, thinking it takes 24 hrs to cure...if my concrete is still curing and then the soil starts to absorb water, that would cause issues right?

Sorry super newb stuff! But having fun!

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Had the trusses built. It was cheaper than buying the lumber at HD, had them built in 3 days (yea not real complicated tusses). Also got all my lumber from the truss supplier too and was a better price point than HD.

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As long as the soil isn't so wet it's flowing and contaminating your concrete you're fine to pour.
 
^ That. You want moisture on the concrete when it's curing. You just don't want flowing/standing water mixing in when you pour it. Once it gets it's initial set - usually a few hours - it'd actually cure better and stronger if it were completely under water.
 
Pour it!
Bridge builders set under water piers with a tremec so you will be ok,
keep direct rain and flowing water away.
sonnotube from grade up for lift only, just set pole into hole and fill wether you encase post is on you.
 
Pour it!
Bridge builders set under water piers with a tremec so you will be ok,
keep direct rain and flowing water away.
sonnotube from grade up for lift only, just set pole into hole and fill wether you encase post is on you.

Thanks yall! Will be pouring this week as time allows after work, but posts should be set by saturday!

Thanks for the advice yall, will keep you posted (pun intended!)
 
The posts are in and concrete done. Temperature highs have been 50 and high 30s at night so i grabbed some electric barrel blankets, painters canvas drop cloth and black visqueen to try and keep the air temp warm over the post holes. Also used propane burner and a keg to keep a bunch of hot water ready for the mix. Im happy with the results.

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Considering what this will be used for and the overall size, I'm leaning towards the "corbel" bolted to the post and truss on the "corbel".

It seems like cutting a notch in the top of the post for the truss to sit directly on the post is stronger, a little more work with accurately cutting the notch and overall more time.

Having a hard time justifying that route since its just a cover to keep my camper dry.

Hope to have the trusses hung up there this week and get a roof on it, gonna go pretty cheap with galvanized corrugated stuff I have laying around work.
 
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It's not that hard to cut some notches imo. I guess either would work, but you're going to spend more in bolts than time to cut notches.

6 in one half dozen the other.
 
Me...
make a jig to strike the 2 lines,( think an l shape, long leg with the rake, short leg marks the shelf depth) use a skillsaw to score the lines and sawsall to clean the gullet out.
WAY stronger and cheaper to...
 
Well i guess i should update:flipoff2: So looking back....now that i know what i know, the next one will go much quicker. First one I built and happy with it though
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PHOTO BOMB!!!:flipoff2:

Built some curbs and filled in with some 2-3" recycle concrete and 3/4 gravel today to give it a level ride when i pull it out. Gonna build a roof what have ya over the "deck" i added to the carport.

I live out of this. Raised in the south, brought the trailer trash up to PNW and living the dream! lol

For what it is, pretty sure i overbuilt the carport but it has held up very nice with our wind storms, ice storms, and snow lately so eh, whatever. I also got lucky on timing, seeing how expensive lumber is now.

Thanks for the pointers from all in the thread.

Cheers!
 
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