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War conflict in the middle east (Azerbajan, Armenia, Turkey)

montrose818

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So the US media is ignoring this but on Sunday Azerbajan started an attack on parts of Armenia, and it has been escalating since. Significant deaths. Azerbajanis are flying drones and other modern tech. Turkey is fully behind Azerbajan. Russia not involved yet, but it may be forced to. Drone shot down over Yerevan (capital) and people are warned of a possible air strike.

​​​Turkey needs to be turned into glass. WWIII starting?

p.s. interesting timing on president getting the covid.
 
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Screen shot from turkish interview.. check out the mao

photo26476.jpg
 
Fuck every last one of those savages. Let them kill each other and get it over with once and for all.
 
I got wind of this days ago, they haven't covered it since. Why not?

Its been escalating. Turkish mobilizing all the way around. Tens and tens of thousands of men and even women flew from all over the world back to armenia to join the fight. I considered it too but I am mixed race and dont even speak the language. Probabpy do more working herr and sending money.

But this is very very serious.
 
Fuck every last one of those savages. Let them kill each other and get it over with once and for all.

Armenians arent savages. They are the first country to accept christianity, and Noahs Arc is known to be in their mountains. They are small, poor, but this is about Christianity.
 
So the US media is ignoring this but on Sunday Azerbajan started an attack on parts of Armenia, and it has been escalating since. Significant deaths. Azerbajanis are flying drones and other modern tech. Turkey is fully behind Azerbajan. Russia not involved yet, but it may be forced to. Drone shot down over Yerevan (capital) and people are warned of a possible air strike.

​​​Turkey needs to be turned into glass. WWIII starting?

p.s. interesting timing on president getting the covid.

That is the Caucasus Region not the ME.

This is a regional war and will not escalate. Russia is too weak right now to do anything. They just updated their Tu-144 bombers and will use smartweapons with those, but the bill on those babies was very, very high for a Russian economy still in freefall from sanctions and low oil prices.

In addition the Russians are rolling out 10 Borei-class SSBNs with Balava missiles and that shit broke the bank. Russia has to play at the big-boy table so they have to have them or they will roll back to what they really are: a 2nd rate Power slightly below the UK.

So the Russians aren't going to do much. They're fighting an insurgency in Ukraine and their economy is in tatters with three major Defense programs running. It will be an opportunity for them to use Tu-144s and that's it, since they are all shiny and re-built.
 
Armenians arent savages. They are the first country to accept christianity, and Noahs Arc is known to be in their mountains. They are small, poor, but this is about Christianity.

So, say Newsome gets that train to Modesto finished through enough graft, corruption, and utter bullshit... are you tall enough to ride?
 
.... but this is about Christianity.

In that neck of the world I’m not surprised one bit

I don’t follow any form of religion, so I will keep my opinions to myself :homer:



*I consider myself a bit of a news junky, this post is the first I’ve heard of this
 
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In that neck of the world I’m not surprised one bit

I don’t follow any form of religion, so I will keep my opinions to myself :homer:



*I consider myself a bit of a news junky, this post is the first I’ve heard of this

its not about following religion, but is about muslim expansion

​No links in english, maybe couple old BBC articles, but it is hot.
 
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I’m not trying to be a tool... but it’s fueled by religion

Or... countless centuries of brainwashing (IMHO)

I thought i typed something different but i guess i forgot. Youre right, religion. What i meant is that it doesnt matter whether you believe in anything or not, what matters (imho) is that muslims growing and expanding is not a good thing. I think everyone universally has that in common. Would you agree, as a non religious person? Or you dont really mind or care if they were to grow? Just curious..
 
I thought i typed something different but i guess i forgot. Youre right, religion. What i meant is that it doesnt matter whether you believe in anything or not, what matters (imho) is that muslims growing and expanding is not a good thing. I think everyone universally has that in common. Would you agree, as a non religious person? Or you dont really mind or care if they were to grow? Just curious..

Religion was not discussed when I was growing up, my folks figured if I was curious I could pick one when I got older. I don’t know if that gives me an advantage or a handicap. I consider myself a history “geek”, I try to learn as much as I can about it. I do know that millions of people have died throughout history because they worshipped “A” instead of “B” (insert whatever religious / tribal / ethnic variations). I agree, some Muslims are a problem right now.

I wish I had a solution
 
I thought i typed something different but i guess i forgot. Youre right, religion. What i meant is that it doesnt matter whether you believe in anything or not, what matters (imho) is that muslims growing and expanding is not a good thing. I think everyone universally has that in common. Would you agree, as a non religious person? Or you dont really mind or care if they were to grow? Just curious..

It's probably a good thing that none of us will be here in 150 years, because well... we wouldn't want to be here. Earth will be a fkg ghetto.
 
Armenians arent savages. They are the first country to accept christianity, and Noahs Arc is known to be in their mountains. They are small, poor, but this is about Christianity.

First country to be brainwashed and/or surrender before being wiped out for not complying does not an anti savage country make.
 
Fuck every last one of those savages. Let them kill each other and get it over with once and for all.

I strongly agree with this sentiment. I strongly disagree with this sentiment.

This is not our responsibility. My liberal side is right: there are good people there who just want to live and raise families. Kumbaya. Doesn't mean it's my problem though. Our focus should be on containing escalation, if anything.

It's probably a good thing that none of us will be here in 150 years, because well... we wouldn't want to be here. Earth will be a fkg ghetto.

Blackpill is never true. No wait, it's almost always true, but we are in the Long Peace

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Long_Peace

It's been a good while since we've had a good ol' fashun bloodletting. Doesn't mean we are due for one either. Optimism can be a powerful force, don't be an enemy.

if biden wins and china attacks us will he surrender to avoid war? :eek: :laughing::flipoff2::stirthepot:

That shit ain't funny. The Dems are in the pocket of the Chinese in some measure.

The Chicoms are a serious fucking threat. I am afraid of them.
 
Is the war in Atropia finally going to happen? The military has been war gaming this for like 30 years 🤣
 
Jerusalem Post Middle East
Iran, Egypt and Gulf cautiously watch Azerbaijan-Armenia conflict
By SETH J. FRANTZMAN OCTOBER 3, 2020 16:02
FILE PHOTO: Azeri men living in Turkey wave flags of Turkey and Azerbaijan during a protest following clashes between Azerbaijan and Armenia, in Istanbul, Turkey, July 19, 2020 (photo credit: REUTERS/MURAD SEZER/FILE PHOTO)
FILE PHOTO: Azeri men living in Turkey wave flags of Turkey and Azerbaijan during a protest following clashes between Azerbaijan and Armenia, in Istanbul, Turkey, July 19, 2020
(photo credit: REUTERS/MURAD SEZER/FILE PHOTO)
Previous clashes between Armenia and Azerbaijan in 2016 and in July of this year did not receive the same level of attention.

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The Middle East is closely watching the outcome of fighting between Armenia and Azerbaijan. This is unusual because previous clashes in 2016 and in July of this year did not receive the same level of attention. The reason that the region is watching is because of Turkey’s deep involvement in pressuring Azerbaijan to push forward and “liberate” territory as protests take place in Iran. Syrian fighters, mostly from the Turkmen minority, have been recruited to fight on the side of Baku.
Turkey’s ruling party, which has close relations with Hamas and the Muslim Brotherhood, wants the region to see the conflict as both an “Islamic” conflict and one that is important to Turkish speakers. On October 1, Turkey put out a statement claiming “Jerusalem is ours,” which appears to link its foreign policy of threatening Israel to its policy of trying to fan the flames against Armenia. Ankara stands to gain in ways from the conflict that are not shared interests with Baku. For instance, Ankara wants to use it to pressure Russia in Idlib. Russia has been trying to secure the M4 highway and there are rumors of Russia-Turkish discussions behind the scenes, trying to take over the Armenia-Azerbaijan conflict and link it to Syria where they have partitioned northern Syria.

Iran has a more sympathetic view of Armenia. Iran’s Fars News has sought to make the conflict appear “Islamic” in order to reduce the support for Azerbaijan by Azeri protesters in Iran. There are millions of members of the Azeri minority in Iran and the country’s leadership fears any local ethnic protest because it knows that it will undermine the already tenuous regime. With Azeris in the streets chanting slogans against Armenians and against Russia and Persians, the regime moved to try to channel them in a different direction.
On Saturday, Iran’s Fars News wrote about Armenia downing an Azerbaijan military aircraft. Tehran is clearly watching closely what the outcome may be. It does not want the conflict to continue. Iran's Fars News ran a second article about Iran's view of the conflict arguing that Iran does not want spillover from the war and that it is warning the parties involved to stop.
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Meanwhile, media that is sympathetic to Iran and Hezbollah has also written on the conflict. Al-Mayadeen has noted that Turkey is “declining” and thus fanning the flames in the Caucuses. The same media notes there are clashes in the countryside of Aleppo, showing how Syria is linked to the battles in Nagorna-Karabakh. One author notes, “it can be said that the Turkish-Azerbaijani military adventure in Nagorno Karabakh is on the way to an end, and it can also be said that Turkey, or President Erdogan in particular, is on the way to losing another file.” The author argues that Turkey’s leader is pressured in Syria and the Mediterranean.
Meanwhile, countries that tend to oppose Turkey’s aggression, such as Egypt and the United Arab Emirates (UAE), have been less critical of the Azerbaijan offensive. This is because, while they view Ankara’s Muslim Brotherhood ambitions in Gaza and Libya as dangerous, they do not view Baku as a problem.
They would prefer, much as Israel appears to prefer, a good relationship with Azerbaijan and not to let Baku move too close to Turkey. Israel's close relationship with Azerbaijan, ostensibly alongside Turkey, thus upsets some of the usual patterns of the region where Ankara and Jerusalem oppose one another. This is largely because this conflict was seen as outside the Middle East alliance system until the last several weeks. Now that alliance system takes on more importance from the Eastern Mediterranean to the Caucuses as it is all knit together globally.
The general regional alliance system in recent years has cemented itself around several groups. There is the Israel-UAE-Bahrain-Jordan-Egypt-Greece-Cyprus group that is linked to Saudi Arabia’s role as well. There is the Turkey-Qatar-Gaza-Libya group that supports Tripoli’s embattled government. Then there is the Iran-Hezbollah-Houthi-Syria regime-Baghdad group that includes Iran’s allies and proxies across the region. Azerbaijan does not fit into these groupings because it has sought an independent foreign policy and not to get involved in Middle East disputes. However, it appears some countries want to link these battles to the Middle East. In a world where the US hegemonic role of the 1990s is changing rapidly, the role of major states such as Russia, Turkey and Iran are growing and that means they will try to broker deals regarding this Caucuses conflict. That has major implications for the rest of the Middle East.
Tags Syria Turkey Azerbaijan Armenia Middle East

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Members of the Armenian Youth Federation protest outside the Azerbaijan consulate general office in Los Angeles.
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Armenia
‘Defend our nation’: Armenian diaspora feels pull of another war
While Kardashians and others raise awareness, some consider returning to fight against Azerbaijan

Michael Safi and Bethan McKernan
@safimichael
Sat 3 Oct 2020 03.00 EDT
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When Azerbaijan went to war this week with Armenia over the breakaway territory of Nagorno-Karabakh, it might have appeared as an obscure conflict with little resonance outside the south Caucasus.

Until you turned to the Twitter account of one of the most famous people in the world, Kim Kardashian. Or that of her husband, Kanye West. Metal fans might have seen tweets about the war from Serj Tankian, the lead singer of System of a Down. If you missed those, there were also posts by Alexis Ohanian Sr, the founder of Reddit and husband of Serena Williams, and former Arsenal footballer Henrikh Mkhitaryan.

The prominent names were among members of the Armenian diaspora who sprang into action when the conflict erupted on Sunday morning, publicising Armenia’s cause in its long-running dispute with Azerbaijan over Nagorno-Karabakh, a territory that is legally Azeri but has been run by a self-declared government of ethnic Armenians since 1994.



Armenia has a population of about 3 million people. But its diaspora, concentrated in the US, with significant hubs in Lebanon, Australia, France and Russia, extends to at least double that size. Woven deeply into its culture are the events of 1915, when historians estimate as many as 1.5 million Armenians were killed by Ottoman Turks in a campaign widely consider by scholars (and stridently denied by Turkey) to be genocidal.


Generations of displacement has nurtured a resilient national identity-in-exile, and a powerful political machine to match. Its heart is southern California, with an Armenian-origin population of at least 500,000 people, according to one estimate, though Armenian advocacy groups say their numbers are twice as many in Los Angeles county alone.

“In a city like LA … you have Armenian schools, Armenian businesses, Armenian churches,” said Alex Galitsky, from the LA-based Armenian National Committee of America’s western region. “Someone could grow up living in LA and never be exposed to anything other than Armenian culture.”

“In the consciousness of the Armenian diaspora, the reason for our community’s existence in these places outside of Armenia is directly a result of the genocide,” Galitsky added.

Armenian refugees waiting on a beach in 1915 for evacuation to Egypt by French and British warships. September 1915.
Armenian refugees waiting on a beach in 1915 for evacuation to Egypt by French and British warships. September 1915. Photograph: Alamy Stock Photo
Since the outbreak of fighting on Sunday – which many analysts say appears to have been instigated by Azerbaijan, albeit after months of tensions being ratcheted up on both sides – Armenian lobby groups have been holding protests, asking Armenian-Americans to lobby their representatives and briefing congresspeople and the media.


Azerbaijan sees the conflict as an effort to reclaim land illegally occupied by Armenian separatists, who forcibly displaced about 7% of its population – roughly 600,000 people – when they took control of Nagorno-Karabakh and surrounding areas during a 1990s war.

For Armenians, the involvement of Turkey in backing Azerbaijan has confirmed their view that it is an existential conflict. “We view this as a continuation of the genocide,” Galitsky said.

In recent years, the Armenian government has stepped up efforts to persuade the diaspora to resettle in the country. Birthright Armenia – which is modelled on a similar Israeli organisation – has since 2003 helped to pay for young diaspora Armenians to live and volunteer in the country.


About 50,000 diaspora Armenians have moved to the country since 1991, according to Repat Armenia, an NGO that assists with the resettlement. Those numbers have surged by 15,000 since a peaceful revolution in 2018, according to one estimate.

Since the start of the Syrian civil war, about 22,000 Syrians of Armenian origin have also resettled in the south Caucasus, according to the Migration Service of Armenia. Many have made their new homes in Nagorno-Karabakh – a trend considered highly provocative and an “illegal settlement policy” by Azerbaijan.

Some of the Armenians who return to the Caucasus do more than settle. During the 1990s war with Azerbaijan, many formed ragtag fighting units that took an active part in the war. One of those who returned wasMonte Melkonian, who was born in California and learned Armenian only as an adult, but died in the battle for Nagorno-Karabakh in 1993. Melkonian is considered a national hero.

Kim and Kourtney Kardashian at the Armenian Genocide Memorial in Yerevan.
Kim and Kourtney Kardashian at the Armenian Genocide Memorial in Yerevan. Photograph: Hayk Baghdasaryan/Photolure/TASS
The fighting this week is the latest spur for many young diaspora Armenians to return. “As diaspora everyone feels the same: we have been waiting for this moment our whole lives,” said George Arbajian, a law student born and raised Beirut, Lebanon, who is leaving for the Armenian capital, Yerevan, next week.


“The idea of fighting for the motherland is very romantic and we are raised with that,” he said. “If the perpetrators of genocide are back we have to go back to the battle field, we don’t have a choice.

“When I say that I mean that could be picking up a gun, helping with logistics, doing aid or water deliveries to [Nagorno-Karabakh’s main city] Stepanakert. I don’t want to say that I’m going to go and pick up a gun and go to the frontline. But I am definitely a step closer to it. I know a lot of people who are doing that.”

Galitsky discusses the phenomenon of returning to take up arms carefully – inciting people to join foreign militias is a serious offence in many jurisdictions. But he acknowledges it happens in Armenian diaspora communities in France and the US, too.


“It’s a tricky situation because of the legal issues around it, but we’ve seen diaspora brigades in the past, especially from Syria, Lebanon and France mobilise and go to Armenia. I’ve anecdotally heard reports of people from our communities here returning [to Armenia].”

“It is not surprising” he continued. “I think a lot of people see themselves as bearing some responsibility for the defence of our nation.”
 
So, say Newsome gets that train to Modesto finished through enough graft, corruption, and utter bullshit... are you tall enough to ride?

So the second season of True Detective? Who's got the Corridor parcels?
 
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