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Spinoff - Wood stoves

Mattafact

Yellow Skull
Joined
May 20, 2020
Member Number
417
Messages
720
Loc
The Real Valley
I'm in escrow on a house that had a wood stove. My first instinct was to get rid of the pipe and seal up the chimney but after seeing these poor bastards in the south shacking up in their cars to stay warm because of power outages maybe I should reconsider.

I'm looking at home depot and there are a ton of different ones and I'm not sure what to look for.

Pic of said location:

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skip home depot... get a quality stove like a Lopi or similar.

If Home Depot still sells Englander NC30's then I can confirm it's a quality stove, and was the best value at the time.

8 years, 30+ cords of wood, and as the primary heat source, it's been flawless
 
Jotul F500 over here. House is 3800 sqft. Holds steady, but you'll be filling it often to maintain temps. We have propane as a backup.

I'm sort of fighting humidity levels right now. Its about 10% in our house. We have a humidifier running non stop upstairs. I have it set to 65. Never goes above 35%. I feed that thing five gallons at least twice a day.

The fresh air feed has me intrigued.
 
If Home Depot still sells Englander NC30's then I can confirm it's a quality stove, and was the best value at the time.

8 years, 30+ cords of wood, and as the primary heat source, it's been flawless

They have an Englander 32-NC. EPA certified too. :flipoff2:
 
Find a 30-year old Vermont Castings without catalyst. Fuck all these new stoves.

I always hear how great those are. Previous owner of our house left a Vermont Casting grill. Biggest pile of shit... :laughing:
 
Skip HD. See if your insurance covers it.

I have a Hearthstone in my house(rental now) and it kicked ass. Soapstone made for a nice thermal sink... stop stuffing it around 8pm and still toasty 6am next day.:grinpimp:
 
My parents and i own one of the oldest wood heating stores in Canada. I will tell you right now, if you want something that will last and work well. You will need to look at something better than Home Depot. Also skip the Vermount castings, biggest pain in the ass to work on and the new replacement parts have gone downhill the last 10 years. I sell lots of Pacific Energy stoves, as well as Jotul, Moroso, Scan, Enerzone, and some BlazeKing. Hands down best bang for the buck out of all the stoves i sell is the Super 27 from Pacific Energy. It will heat 2000 sq ft in our climate. It will hold a 10 hour burn and produce very little ash in a week, when using good dry wood. Most customers end up using 3-4 bushcord of hardwood in a average season.
I am not a fan of fresh air intakes unless they can be direct connected to the fire box. Even then the only homes i see the benefit is in brand new construction. Other than that its just another air leak in the house.
 
Definitely get a new stove! Soapstone if you can afford one or a wood cook stove if you're in an area that loses power frequently and had cold weather.
 
We have a Vermont Castings. it is 30 years old and put 4 cords of wood in it every year.
heats the house well, though I have a vent in the ceiling with duct work that takes the warm air into the back bedrooms
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Definitely get a new stove! Soapstone if you can afford one or a wood cook stove if you're in an area that loses power frequently and had cold weather.

Inlaws had a Soapstone at their old place. Nice setup. Heated well. He swore by it.
 
My parents and i own one of the oldest wood heating stores in Canada. I will tell you right now, if you want something that will last and work well. You will need to look at something better than Home Depot. Also skip the Vermount castings, biggest pain in the ass to work on and the new replacement parts have gone downhill the last 10 years. I sell lots of Pacific Energy stoves, as well as Jotul, Moroso, Scan, Enerzone, and some BlazeKing. Hands down best bang for the buck out of all the stoves i sell is the Super 27 from Pacific Energy. It will heat 2000 sq ft in our climate. It will hold a 10 hour burn and produce very little ash in a week, when using good dry wood. Most customers end up using 3-4 bushcord of hardwood in a average season.
I am not a fan of fresh air intakes unless they can be direct connected to the fire box. Even then the only homes i see the benefit is in brand new construction. Other than that its just another air leak in the house.

That Classic LE is a good looking stove.
 
I use a wood stove as my primary heat for 2,200 sq ft house and burn for 5+ months of the year. Been using Kuma for 20 years. No affiliation.
https://www.kumastoves.com
 
How about a pellet stove or wood chip stove? There are some cool things out there with gasification that burns super clean. Still would need a bit of electricity but cleaner and not so hate by insurance companies.
 
Find a 30-year old Vermont Castings without catalyst. Fuck all these new stoves.

Not a fan of the catalyst type, but that's not your only option with a newer type of stove.

Go with one with the secondary burn tubes at the top the firebox. No moving parts and it's much more efficient than any of the old stoves.

The biggest reason that people hate newer stoves is because they are less forgiving when using unseasoned wood.
 
I always hear how great those are. Previous owner of our house left a Vermont Casting grill. Biggest pile of shit... :laughing:

I got a Vermont Castings grill 20 years ago from a stove shop, not HD. I have replaced 2 burners in it and that is it, we use it alot. It's got really heavy grates and the lid is super stout. Might need to bend up a new grease catch this year to keep it all good.
 
IMHO it's worth having, especially since the hard part is already there. Only thing to check on is clearances on side/back since there's no heat resistant back on the hearth. Also as mentioned very with insurance - since the pipe is already there I'd expect it already be accounted for, but worth checking.

Personally, I like having the added warm and there's plenty of wood to find around here. Also certainly a plus if you lose power.

I'd look for used before I get new, especially cheap junk. Plenty of nice older stoves out there that are both higher quality and cheaper than new big box store. And less emissions BS to deal with.
 
I sold stoves for 15 years, Jotul, Pacific Energy, Hearthstone, Kuma, Enviro and Blaze King. The best by far and the one in my house is Blaze King, Stay away from any of the shit that they sell online or in the big box stores.
 
Anyone know what the little brass rails on the surface at the sides of a stove like this are for?
They aren't strong enough to be used for lifting or placing the stove.
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Mine has those and it's driving me nuts not knowing what the point is.
 
Anyone know what the little brass rails on the surface at the sides of a stove like this are for?
They aren't strong enough to be used for lifting or placing the stove.


Mine has those and it's driving me nuts not knowing what the point is.

Probably decoration. Similar to the brass plates on the front.
 
How about a pellet stove or wood chip stove? There are some cool things out there with gasification that burns super clean. Still would need a bit of electricity but cleaner and not so hate by insurance companies.

We have a pellet stove as our primary heat, and it tends to get cold here for weeks at a time. Everyone having issues with power and heat has got me to thinking about how to make it work when the power goes out. May look into a battery and solar panel for long term. Not sure if it is feasible. current plan is to use a genset and run a cord into the house. My primary concern is that it runs almost 24/7 from late Oct to early May.

I have an old wood fireplace I can replace it with if I need to resort to time proven heat.
 
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