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Sinkhole swallows houses, as landslide hits Norway village

bigun

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https://www.nzherald.co.nz/world/si...ts-norway-village/MSUDNMRLM3PTHUWHUONNTPXRAA/
Video is after the fact not like the last one where you watched the houses moving

Sinkhole swallows houses, 21 people missing as landslide hits Norway village

A landslide has smashed into a residential area near the Norwegian capital, injuring at least 10 people, leaving 21 unaccounted for and destroying several homes.

Some 700 people have been evacuated amid fears of further landslides.

Norwegian police were alerted at 4am Wednesday (local time) to the slide in the village of Ask, in the municipality of Gjerdrum, some 20km northeast of Oslo.
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The landslide cut across a road through Ask, leaving a deep ravine. Photo / AP
The landslide cut across a road through Ask, leaving a deep ravine that cars could not pass. Video footage showed dramatic scenes including one house falling into the ravine. Photos showed at least eight homes destroyed.
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A house teeters on the edge of the ravine. Photo / AP
Police spokesman Roger Pettersen told Norwegian media there were no reports of missing people, but officials could not rule out the possibility of people in collapsed buildings. He said some 21 people registered to live in the area are unaccounted for.

"The 21 people may have evacuated themselves but may also still be in the landslide area," Pettersen told news agency NTB.
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Rescue personnel arrive at the scene. Ten people are injured and 21 are missing after the landslide. Photo / AP
One of the injured was seriously hurt, while nine had lighter injuries. Weather at the time was reported to be challenging, with snow and full winter conditions.

Ask is home to some 5000 people.
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At least eight homes were destroyed in the landslide. Photo / AP
"It hurts to see how the forces of nature have ravaged Gjerdrum. My thoughts go to all those affected by the landslide. Now it is important that the emergency services get their job done," Norwegian Prime Minister Erna Solberg tweeted.

In a separate statement, she called the disaster "probably one of the biggest landslides we have had, and with the biggest consequences".

The area where Ask is located is known for having a lot of so-called quick clay, which can change from solid to liquid form. There have been previous landslides reported there.
 
That shit is the real deal. I make shit like this in my first wash pond. It’s crazy shit feels hard as a rock. A excavator will drive on it without sinking in a 1”. 2 scoops later the shit liquefies and you sink up to the counterweight. It then hardens up once you stop struggling lol.
 
house built on trailer frame? still together even with half of it in the hole.

fancy new construction multi-family housing unit? crumbled in half and in a pile at the bottom.

How do you like your fancy stick houses now :flipoff2:

This is your contribution?

:lmao:

Prayers for the families. :eek:
 
Being a dirt nerd and fixing issues like this for a living, this is pretty cool stuff for me. This clay was deposited in a marine environment where there is dissolved salt. The clay particle arrangement is like a house of cards due to the salt ions. In most clays, the particles are arranged like a deck of cards. Over time the salt leaches out of the deposit and the particles are left in the same arrangement but do not have the charge to hold them together. They can support a bunch of vertical pressure but as soon as you induce any lateral strain it tends to liquify. If you google Rissa (also in Norway) landslide you will see one of these slides in action.

We design and build fixes for a bunch of landslides, but this stuff is a different animal. Scary as hell since the slides occur without warning and can propagate very quick. I suspect they won’t try and fix it. I wouldn’t be surprised if they just set charges and blasted it into a more stable arrangement.
 
It's now down to ten people missing, I suspect they are down there with their houses... I used to live half a mile from the place the slide happened, there is a lot of unstable ground in the neighbourhood there, a friend of mine lost their house in a smaller landslide maybe 2 miles to the north of this slide. I'm glad I slid out of there 15 years ago
 
Being a dirt nerd and fixing issues like this for a living, this is pretty cool stuff for me. This clay was deposited in a marine environment where there is dissolved salt. The clay particle arrangement is like a house of cards due to the salt ions. In most clays, the particles are arranged like a deck of cards. Over time the salt leaches out of the deposit and the particles are left in the same arrangement but do not have the charge to hold them together. They can support a bunch of vertical pressure but as soon as you induce any lateral strain it tends to liquify. If you google Rissa (also in Norway) landslide you will see one of these slides in action.

We design and build fixes for a bunch of landslides, but this stuff is a different animal. Scary as hell since the slides occur without warning and can propagate very quick. I suspect they won’t try and fix it. I wouldn’t be surprised if they just set charges and blasted it into a more stable arrangement.

That's fascinating that there is so much science and structure in the stuff that is beneath our feet. For the most part I just think of there being dirt, rocks, and mud, and my mind never goes beyond that.
 
Clay is weird stuff, the above is really crazy. Sucks for those people. Not even sure how you recover from something like that? Bunch of folk here lost their house as it was build on a shallow mine and the builders neglected to tell anyone.

My dad was telling me of a job redoing a road that had swelled due to clay base, they would drive the excavator down the road and it would roll like jello after a rain storm.
 
Being a dirt nerd and fixing issues like this for a living, this is pretty cool stuff for me. This clay was deposited in a marine environment where there is dissolved salt. The clay particle arrangement is like a house of cards due to the salt ions. In most clays, the particles are arranged like a deck of cards. Over time the salt leaches out of the deposit and the particles are left in the same arrangement but do not have the charge to hold them together. They can support a bunch of vertical pressure but as soon as you induce any lateral strain it tends to liquify. If you google Rissa (also in Norway) landslide you will see one of these slides in action.

We design and build fixes for a bunch of landslides, but this stuff is a different animal. Scary as hell since the slides occur without warning and can propagate very quick. I suspect they won’t try and fix it. I wouldn’t be surprised if they just set charges and blasted it into a more stable arrangement.

Just fucking wow. Video is a little long but it shows exactly what you described. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3q-qfNlEP4A


EDIT: So they knew about these mud conditions, yet still built all of these communities on top of them?
 
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That's fascinating that there is so much science and structure in the stuff that is beneath our feet. For the most part I just think of there being dirt, rocks, and mud, and my mind never goes beyond that.

The field is relatively new. The guy that is considered the father of soil mechanics is Karl Terzaghi, he lived until the 60s. The number two guy that worked under Terzaghi was a guy named Ralph Peck. I actually got to meet him a number of times as he was still alive well into my career. Not many science or engineering fields where you actually get to meet people that were considered the founders.
 
That's a pretty big slide to hit in the middle of town :eek: . I'm surprised no one noticed any slippage before it went.
 
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