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Reloading Gear, what do you use?

Tech Tim

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What set-up are you running and why?

Single? Progressive? I carve all my bullets out of lead blocks and roll my own brass out of old door knobs?

Edit: Yes, I know there is already a reloading thread with Qs, this one is more to just discuss different gear set-ups.
 
Hornady single stage. Bought it to learn on and never upgraded to a progressive. Have all hornady dies as well. Only oddballs are the RCBS bullet puller and primer pocket swedger tool.
 
Hornady and rcbs single stage presses for necked brass. I have three on the bench with a different die for the same caliber in each. I should just get a good turret press but this works.
3 Lee pro 1000s one each 9mm .40 and .45.
Rcbs vibratory tumbler with walnut and Nufinish.
Digital scale and a rcbs beam.
Vintage Lyman trimmer
Lyman hand primer
Rcbs dies for my necked calibers and lee carbide for pistol.
 
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I reload with a RCBS Pro2000 (progressive press) for 9mm, .357 Mag, .44 Mag, .45acp, .223, x39 and lastly .308. All of my dies are LEE except for the .223 dies, those are RCBS.
I use LEE dies because they are of the highest quality and the LOWEST price. I heisted the .223 RCBS dies from my stepdad when he stopped reloading decades ago. He used a LYMAN (IIRC) turret press that only shaved off about ten minutes from an exhausting evenings reloading. After using that slowasmud press I knew that if I ever reloaded again I would definitely purchase a progressive. I went with RCBS because of the OUTSTANDING customer service (and the press was on sale, that didn't hurt). However, just recently I have discovered that RCBS has discontinued the Pro2000, hope that doesn't affect parts (two parts have "broke" so far after 10 years of service, both replaced completely free of charge with just a phone call).

For the accessories (puller, tumbler, trimmer, scale, caliper, etc..) it's a mish-mash of whatever was cheapest. I own quite a bit of Frankford Arsenal crap, no complaints. Trimmer is a manual crank Lyman.

My goto reloading manual is a Lyman.

EDIT----> I use a whisper of PAM for case lube. :)
 
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So for those of you loading rifle on a dillon 550 are you just loading for spray and pray rounds or are you loading for precision? I just dont see where youre getting the same level of consistency for say .250 MOA groups on a progressive press.
 
I use my 550 for pistol rounds at speed. While I am processing the brass for consistency & accuracy my goal is 10 ring not sub inch. Suits my carry gun and skills just fine. For rifle I'll be tooling up with single stage.
 
I have a 1980s Lee Turrent Press, it's buried under layers of piles of cholla needles and rat poo in one of the storage buildings
 
So for those of you loading rifle on a dillon 550 are you just loading for spray and pray rounds or are you loading for precision? I just dont see where youre getting the same level of consistency for say .250 MOA groups on a progressive press.

Most people can't shoot that well even with perfect ammo. In any case, the limiting factor with those presses is the powder measure. It's not super consistent with big stick powders. If you run spherical ones you can definitely get well under 1 MOA with good components and setup. If you want to push it further you can just run an electronic powder measure and the powder funnel adapter Dillon sells (or any other powder funnel that strikes your fancy for that matter).
 
Most people can't shoot that well even with perfect ammo. In any case, the limiting factor with those presses is the powder measure. It's not super consistent with big stick powders. If you run spherical ones you can definitely get well under 1 MOA with good components and setup. If you want to push it further you can just run an electronic powder measure and the powder funnel adapter Dillon sells (or any other powder funnel that strikes your fancy for that matter).

Regardless of the powder measure I dont see where someone is running a progressive is getting the same consistency on their sizing, seating primers, and seating crimping the bullet. How do you decap, size and then check if you need to trim on a prog press?

If you are stopping and checking why bother running a progressive press? Like I said I can see for throw it down range and be happy it hits a dessert sized paper plate at a hundred yards but I dont see anyone concerned with real precision using a progressive.
 
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It's not much different for consistency of stroke than you have with a single stage. You can still pull the occasional case from each station to verify powder charge, length, and that sort of stuff. Is it going to be as consistent for depth as a co-ax or some of the really gucci stuff sinclair sells? No, but you can still make 3/4 MOA or better ammo on it with a lot less tedium than a single stage. And for shooters like me that's good enough for most of what I do. Heck a few high power shooters I know place quite well using ammo loaded on a 550 without hand throwing powder.

The decap and size thing is pretty easy, just set up a toolhead with a decapping die and run them through there, then do your trim operation. You can even go crazy and do a dedicated decap/size and then power trim toolhead setup. Those work pretty nicely.
 
Dillon 650, Dillon 550, and a RCBS single stage.
Dillon 550 does my 'precision' rifle rounds, but I pull the case and charge with a Lee automated powder trickler. Yes it does some very sub MOA ammo.
650 does USPSA ammo (9 and 40) and some bulk loaded .223. Got a case trimmer head and you can really crank out 223.
 
Dillon 450, yeah it's old. I use Dillon dies for .38, 357, 40 S&W. I have some RCBS dies for various rifle calibers and CH4D dies for 22-243. I progressively load pistol rounds and .223 but decap size and trim other rifle brass then prime and load with individual weighed charges. I cant see upgrading my press as I don't trust the "auto" primer, powder and brass feeders. I use a Forster hand trimmer with electric screwdriver adaptor. I generally full length size brass except 22-243 as those only get fired in the chamber they were fireformed in, I neck size them leaving about .010 thousands neck unsized to help center the brass in the chamber. I recently bought a Hornady electric powder scale which is awesome. I agree on using several reloading books, I have at least 12-13 including some very old classics from Nosler, Speer and Lyman. I also have an old two volume set of PO Ackley's books. It's fun to compare the old data to the more current stuff and also the vintage books are helpful if you acquire obsolete cartridges or discontinued powers at swap meets. I can spend hours in the reloading room and lose myself in there.
 
Redding single stage press, Hornady balance beam scale, RCBS powder measure, Cabela’s tumbler. Other accessories and tools are a mix of whatever brand was on the shelf. Dies are RCBS, Lee, Hornady, and Pacific. I reload for everything I own except the rimfires and shotguns (17 cartridges).
 
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