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Recommend me a dry saw

vikingsven

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I'm in the market for a dry saw, $400-$500 range. I'm aware of the so-so reviews on the Dewalt, but what are the opinions on other reputable brands? I'm considering a Makita, but not sure on the 12" blade size, and looking at Evolution also. Usage will be home garage type work, cutting tubing, flat bar, etc. What else?
 
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my dad's got one of the evosaw 380 ones
soon as you put a new blade in it he manages to knock multiple teeth off of it

I kinda like the abrasive counterpart after those experiences
certainly get the 14 rather than the 12, unless you're carrying it around jobsites there's no reason to go for the smaller blade size
 
I got the Fein Slugger and love it. It's one of those tools I am not sure how I lived without it. I cut (3) 1"x2"x.120" wall tubes in probably 3-5 seconds.

https://feintools-online.com/729053...MI_feSr4mK7QIVrx6tBh0JhQAaEAYYBCABEgIQ3_D_BwE

I have one of these too. It cut lazer straight when I first got it but now I am chasing some wonky angles. Talking about 1/16" to 1/32" over 4" or so. I think setting up a proper Mitre stand situation might help, because I am normally cutting on my sloped ass driveway and propping up the other end of the stock. I spent an afternoon dismantling and cleaning everything and improved it a bit (chips can get under the steel plate in the cast aluminum bottom) but I can't get it perfect again because there is no adjustment in the vertical angle.

The Diablo Cermet blades work fine and are $45 bucks cheaper than the slugger blades. You will know when the blade is fucked cause it will start bouncing, apparently the guys at work can't figure it out and just let the toothless blade rub it's way though finished metal products. :rolleyes:
 
I have one of these too. It cut lazer straight when I first got it but now I am chasing some wonky angles. Talking about 1/16" to 1/32" over 4" or so. I think setting up a proper Mitre stand situation might help, because I am normally cutting on my sloped ass driveway and propping up the other end of the stock. I spent an afternoon dismantling and cleaning everything and improved it a bit (chips can get under the steel plate in the cast aluminum bottom) but I can't get it perfect again because there is no adjustment in the vertical angle.

The Diablo Cermet blades work fine and are $45 bucks cheaper than the slugger blades. You will know when the blade is fucked cause it will start bouncing, apparently the guys at work can't figure it out and just let the toothless blade rub it's way though finished metal products. :rolleyes:

Oh and get at least a 14" blade, I think evolution has a 15"? Bigger is better especially once you start cutting 45s
 
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I have the 10" Evolution saw (new version is R255SMS+). I've had it 2 years and I think I'm on blade #3. I've been happy with blade life, don't pay too much attention to how many cuts I get, but blades last long enough that I lose track of when I put the last one on.

https://store.evolutionpowertools.com/products/r255sms_plus?_pos=1&_sid=23a4b5b7e&_ss=r

I cut mostly tube and square stock in it, all from 3/4" to 2" OD with wall thickness from 0.125 to 0.375. Occasionally I'll do flat stock. Also used it for some wood cuts when I need to knock something out quick.

Happy with it for the price. my next goal is to make a stand to hang it off my fab table with the base at the same height as the table top for making it easier to support longer pieces.

Only gripe I have is that there is no clamp like a chop saw, but there's a flat backing piece that I can c-clamp to.
 
I saw the evolution ones got good reviews then read one that said get the 15" version (380?) but it was OOS. How does the Fein chop saw compare to the Evo?
 
I was gonna say Milwaukee but it doesn’t look like they’re making them anymore. I’ve beat the piss out of mine for about 10 years with no issues cutting stuff its probably not supposed to.

So used Milwaukee :flipoff2:
 
Each still has it's place. For cutting carbon steel, the dry cut saw blows horizontal bandsaws out of the water. For hard and exotic material, sure, a bandsaw would be the correct tool.

Unless you're running a carbide tooth blade on your bandsaw I wouldn't use it on hardened material. IMHO with a nice variable tooth bi-metal blade on the bandsaw I would pick it over a dry cut saw any day of the week. With a swiveling head angle changes are fast, simple, and accurate. My bandsaw slices through mild steel rather quickly. the dry cut might be slightly faster, but not by much. Also the chips off the bandsaw aren't nearly as annoying as the chips off a dry cut saw. Also bandsaw blades are cheaper than dry cut blades.

I have one of those Milwaukee dry cut saws and it just sits there while the bandsaw gets used all the damn time. For hard stuff I'll either use a grinder and cutoff wheel or an old abrasive chopsaw outside because fuck cleaning up that mess.
 
Unless you're running a carbide tooth blade on your bandsaw I wouldn't use it on hardened material.

depends on hardness, but bimetal at 10sfpm is going to last way longer than carbide at the nearly 6000 sfpm that the evosaw380 runs at
 
I didn't make it down to Sceep's



Hopefully we all get to go to Hammers this year!!

If we do, It's on like Donkey Kong.
 
I dont have the room or power for a tower crane, but I've owned several. Want the right tool? Get the right tool.

Recommend a dry cut saw for home use, with standard 120V/240V receptacles. The smaller the footprint the better.
 
[486 said:
;n199954]

a portaband is smaller than a dry cut saw

...also, I prefer to be able to cut 45* angles without eyeballing them.
 
Unless you're running a carbide tooth blade on your bandsaw I wouldn't use it on hardened material. IMHO with a nice variable tooth bi-metal blade on the bandsaw I would pick it over a dry cut saw any day of the week. With a swiveling head angle changes are fast, simple, and accurate. My bandsaw slices through mild steel rather quickly. the dry cut might be slightly faster, but not by much. Also the chips off the bandsaw aren't nearly as annoying as the chips off a dry cut saw. Also bandsaw blades are cheaper than dry cut blades.

I have one of those Milwaukee dry cut saws and it just sits there while the bandsaw gets used all the damn time. For hard stuff I'll either use a grinder and cutoff wheel or an old abrasive chopsaw outside because fuck cleaning up that mess.


I use bimetal bandsaw blades regularly on hardened steel, several grades of stainless and even 6AL-4V. Bandsaws absolutely have their place, but for a cut-off on mild steel, I’m now sold on the dry cut.

I’d like to see a bandsaw make this cut as fast, straight, and burr free.

https://fb.watch/1QdCi2Duu-/

ETA: the chips on this saw don’t bother me at all. The tool has a great chip drawer that catches nearly all of them. Pretty much the only chips on the ground come from ones that ended up inside the cut tube and fall out when picked up.
 
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I have the Makita LC1230 12” saw. No idea how I lived without it. Possibly the best purchase I’ve made for cutting straight and accurate. I rarely use my portaband since I got it.
 
[486 said:
;n200069]

45, 46 who gives a fuck, shoot some hot glue on it and it'll all be the same
needs a gap for full penetration anyways

I do. I always bevel anything I'm welding together like that but if I want square table legs I want the SQUARE, not kinda sorta close to square if you close one eye and tilt your head a bit.
 
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