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Dean Smith & Grace 17x72 Lathe

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Brought this thing home for scrap price. Time to clean it up and put it back to work.

This thread is continued from here--------------->https://irate4x4.com/chit-chat/163920-quick-advice-on-engine-lathe

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All I've done so far is soak in WD-40 and scrub gently with a tooth-brush.

Thoughts on the condition of the ways? It was in an unheated shed for some time.
How do I clean them up without further damage?

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Sweet nice haul.
I am a little confused by that rear tool post, I have not seen one built like that, I am assuming some sort of motorized taper attachment.
 
All I've done so far is soak in WD-40 and scrub gently with a tooth-brush.

Thoughts on the condition of the ways? It was in an unheated shed for some time.
How do I clean them up without further damage?

Hmmm, hard to tell in the picture they don't look pitted, hit them with some scotch bright or 2000 grit paper, and see what happens.
 
You did good. Some form of oil and a scotchbrite pad. If you run your finger nail up the ways there should no ridge.
 
Subbed. Got yourself a lot of elbow grease ahead of you. X3 on scotchbite and a lube I would use diesel because its cheap. Might be able to rig up a jig with wood or angle iron to make it easier to clean up and apply even pressure on the ways. I would probably pull the wipers at least if not the entire carriage depending on difficulty. Would give you a chance to clean and inspect I the piece that should have the most wear.
 
no abrasives on slide ways, that's the quick way to show you're the sort of retard to slap a bunch of shitty paint on a machine and call it a rebuild

hit them with chelating solution like evaporust, then a scraper
 
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[486 said:
;n178240]no abrasives on slide ways, that's the quick way to show you're the sort of retard to slap a bunch of shitty paint on a machine and call it a rebuild

hit them with chelating solution like evaporust, then a scraper

Eh, not all of us are too slobbish to clean up after themselves. The rate of material removal of scotchbrite is too slow to matter unless you do something stupid like use the angle grinder wheels and sit in one place. Lathe ways are easy enough to clean the grit out of. Where people go wrong is sitting in one spot forever with a wire wheel or scotchbrite wheel to make it shine. The grit scotchbrite leaves behind is a non-issue if you just clean it up before you reassemble. A shop lathe will get coated in worse stuff as part of normal use.

Someday I'll get a cast iron rod, mic it and hit it with the cup brush, stainless cup brush and scotchbrite wheel and then mic it again to show how slow the removal rates of those things actually are.
 
You are not trying to make it bright. Just knock the lumps down. I then wipe it down with mineral spirts and then add way oil. New wipers is not a bad idea.
 
Do you have all the pieces of the tracer?
 
Do you have all the pieces of the tracer?

I believe so, other than a hydraulic pump. There's those two centers on the back side of the lathe along with extra ways that they slide on. The tool post on top along with 3 or 4 sets of dovetail slides (depending on how you count them). Underneath there is a stylus (it's free to move a little as it should I believe).

Should there be anything else?
 
Here's some more shots of the tracer, including the nameplate. You can see the stylus hanging below where the nameplate is, and you can see it's lined up with those centers.

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I'd wire brush the ways by hand and then oil and stone them. Not trying to make them bright, just making sure they are flat. Won't take much at all.
 
Tail stock has a built in live center for shaft work.
 
Tail stock has a built in live center for shaft work.

Ok, can you explain how that works? When I spin the big wheel with the handle, the big shiny part comes out the other side. I'm pretty sure it's tapered inside as you'd expect. I can't turn it by hand, which is what I expected.

You think the whole big shiny part should be free to spin? Wouldn't that prevent you from being able to use a dead center (center that doesn't turn)?
 
probably just a tag that came with the factory installed tracer attachment package
it's probably just a standard MT4 tailstock
 
Eh, not all of us are too slobbish to clean up after themselves.
take a carbide scraper, hell even just an insert brazed to a handle
run it over a rusty slideway, the rust just falls right off leaving a nearly factory finish behind with no dimensional worries

or scrub at it for a few hours what do I care
the more of your posts I read the more I equate you to that a.v.e. guy
 
I have a monarch and it has bearing in the quill to turn shafting. The part with the 4 hole pattern turns. When you use a drill chuck the two flats keep it from turning.

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Use a single edge razor blade in a holder to scrape the ways, like cleaning a window.
 
I have a monarch and it has bearing in the quill to turn shafting. The part with the 4 hole pattern turns. When you use a drill chuck the two flats keep it from turning.

I've never seen that style. By two flats, do you mean the tang on the end of the MT shank? That's actually a really awesome setup.


Keith Rucker is rebuilding a 22" Monarch that has a permanent live center. I actually brought him up a standard tailstock that I found at a local salvage yard - it was slightly different from his, but he was either going to just swap quills or modify the entire tailstock so he could swap them back and forth.

Here's a 22" Monarch tailstock with my 12" craftsman tailstock for comparison. I have a toy. :laughing:
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Yes the flats on the MT shank keep it from turning
 
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