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Custom stainless braided brake lines

Aisin

Grumpy old fuck
Joined
May 19, 2020
Member Number
304
Messages
2,392
I am looking for places that manufacture braided brake lines. Do anybody have a place that they use? I know there is G&J in Ontario. Yes, I know I can use adapters to accomplish what I want but I would like as little parts required to do the job. Thanks!:flipoff2:
 
In West Sacramento Hose and Fittings Etc, a Parker dealer.

I used them to fabricate my boat waterlines out of stainless steel tube with 37° flare ends.

Also plan on using them again to do my M1031 CUCV truck brake lines and fuel lines.

It would have helped to know your location to send you somewhere close.


https://www.google.com/search?client...trex_id:CkhKcb
 
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They have an outlet in reno / sparks area but thats what like 500 miles north of you.

If you want to risk mail ordering such a thing you might need to supply them with a sample of what you want them to fabricate.
 
They have an outlet in reno / sparks area but thats what like 500 miles north of you.

If you want to risk mail ordering such a thing you might need to supply them with a sample of what you want them to fabricate.

I can send a cheap China rubber hose for a sample. I’m waiting for G&J to get back to me. I emailed them yesterday.
 
G&S is great for surplus I first started dealing with the old man 30+ years ago.

A rubber hose wont fly as a sample if you want to have them bend you a custom stainless brake or fuel line.
 
G&S is great for surplus I first started dealing with the old man 30+ years ago.

A rubber hose wont fly as a sample if you want to have them bend you a custom stainless brake or fuel line.

Did you miss the braided part? I can buy a factory rubber brake line but want a braided hose for durability.
 
any Napa auto parts nearby? some of the franchises make hydraulic hoses.

It's been many years but I paid like $15 for a nice braided line to install Nissan calipers on my Jeep
 
Yes I must have..lol...

Thought you wanted stainless hardline, as that would be the smart way to go.

I suppose at times I forget how cheap the membership here and pirate4x4 is.


Braided teflon line wont pass brake inspection if the need ever arises.

Did you miss the braided part? I can buy a factory rubber brake line but want a braided hose for durability.
 
I am looking for places that manufacture braided brake lines. Do anybody have a place that they use? I know there is G&J in Ontario. Yes, I know I can use adapters to accomplish what I want but I would like as little parts required to do the job. Thanks!:flipoff2:

you are better off calling G&J. i have yet to find a hose they couldnt make to my specs while i wait.
 
you are better off calling G&J. i have yet to find a hose they couldnt make to my specs while i wait.

I figured they were the ones to call. In the mean time I found something that might work. Gotta research more.
 
You can always get the rebuildable style ends and a roll of hose and do them yourself if it’s non DOT. If it is DOT them you will need a shop to crimp them with DOT rated fittings.
There is a Hose and Fittings Parker store in Fresno CA.
 
You can always get the rebuildable style ends and a roll of hose and do them yourself if it’s non DOT. If it is DOT them you will need a shop to crimp them with DOT rated fittings.
There is a Hose and Fittings Parker store in Fresno CA.

I forgot about Parker.
 
Tubes n’ Hoses Of Loveland Co.
2650 N. Lincoln Ave
Loveland CO 80538
Phone: (970) 593-6988
 
You can always get the rebuildable style ends and a roll of hose and do them yourself if it’s non DOT. If it is DOT them you will need a shop to crimp them with DOT rated fittings.
There is a Hose and Fittings Parker store in Fresno CA.

IIRC the SAE spec that the relevant FMVSS references doesn't care about the ends. It just specifies the forces the hose has to withstand. The only one that sticks out to me as something that would be hard to achieve without crimped ends is the pull force which IIRC is 600lb (don't quote me on that, it's been a few years and I no longer have access to the spec). If you can make a braided stainless hose do what the spec asks then it's DOT compliant whether you think it is or not.
 
IIRC the SAE spec that the relevant FMVSS references doesn't care about the ends. It just specifies the forces the hose has to withstand. The only one that sticks out to me as something that would be hard to achieve without crimped ends is the pull force which IIRC is 600lb (don't quote me on that, it's been a few years and I no longer have access to the spec). If you can make a braided stainless hose do what the spec asks then it's DOT compliant whether you think it is or not.

Correct. I have a set of rear braided lines in front of me that say DOT on them.
 
I just take my old line or a couple old lines with the ends I need and bring them to the local hydraulic hose shop. I would have to imagine there is one in Vegas
 
Yes!!!

With all of the building, excavators and bulldozers would keep a hose business on its toes servicing those needs.

But I sincerly doubt that braided stainless lines would pass a DOT roadside inspection and personally I wouldnt use them for the majority of the brake or fuel line as they are too fragile and easily damaged.

Thats most likely why brake lines are made of steel or stainless steel in more modern cars and trucks.

A individual putting in braided stainless teflon lines beyond in the areas on a vehicle where they need to flex IE at calipers or from frame to differential etc is a fool. And yes has the potential to kill a few busloads of LGBT nuns.

OP how old are you ?





I just take my old line or a couple old lines with the ends I need and bring them to the local hydraulic hose shop. I would have to imagine there is one in Vegas
 
Yes!!!

With all of the building, excavators and bulldozers would keep a hose business on its toes servicing those needs.

But I sincerly doubt that braided stainless lines would pass a DOT roadside inspection and personally I wouldnt use them for the majority of the brake or fuel line as they are too fragile and easily damaged.

Thats most likely why brake lines are made of steel or stainless steel in more modern cars and trucks.

A individual putting in braided stainless teflon lines beyond in the areas on a vehicle where they need to flex IE at calipers or from frame to differential etc is a fool. And yes has the potential to kill a few busloads of LGBT nuns.

OP how old are you ?

How old are you?

Every time you open your mouth it becomes clear that time has passed you by, you have no desire to learn the how and why behind things and that your mind is full of "I was told so therefore that's how it is" stupidity.

You ever looked under the hood of a Chevy made this century? You're gonna see braided stainless going from the master cylinder to the hard lines on the body/frame. There's no reason you couldn't use braided stainless the whole way other than the all the extra clips and chafing prevention you'd need to do it right wouldn't make it worth it and (just like every other hose) it degrades over time.

Provided it's held in properly and won't chafe there's no reason braided stainless couldn't be used for an entire vehicle as long as you're ok with the cost and ok with replacing it when the rubber eventually gives out (like it will on any other brake line) but depending on where you live that could be longer than the lifespan of steel lines.

Would I plumb my vehicle solely with braided? No. But that doesn't mean that someone willing to do the extra work can't make it work for them.
 
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Yes!!!

With all of the building, excavators and bulldozers would keep a hose business on its toes servicing those needs.

But I sincerly doubt that braided stainless lines would pass a DOT roadside inspection and personally I wouldnt use them for the majority of the brake or fuel line as they are too fragile and easily damaged.

Thats most likely why brake lines are made of steel or stainless steel in more modern cars and trucks.

A individual putting in braided stainless teflon lines beyond in the areas on a vehicle where they need to flex IE at calipers or from frame to differential etc is a fool. And yes has the potential to kill a few busloads of LGBT nuns.

OP how old are you ?

Where has anyone said anything about replacing hard line with hose? It seems to me that your the one that keeps bringing that up.
 
Braided (teflon) stainless yes but I doubt its braided (rubber) stainless as rubber stainless isnt made that will withstand the brake pressures.


Rubber / stainless braid is made for water and low pressure fuel, air, etc.
 
Yes!!!

With all of the building, excavators and bulldozers would keep a hose business on its toes servicing those needs.

But I sincerly doubt that braided stainless lines would pass a DOT roadside inspection and personally I wouldnt use them for the majority of the brake or fuel line as they are too fragile and easily damaged.

Thats most likely why brake lines are made of steel or stainless steel in more modern cars and trucks.

A individual putting in braided stainless teflon lines beyond in the areas on a vehicle where they need to flex IE at calipers or from frame to differential etc is a fool. And yes has the potential to kill a few busloads of LGBT nuns.

OP how old are you ?

What are you on about? The braided line goes from the hard line at the frame to the caliper, you know like the many aftermarket versions that are sold as brake lines and are DOT approved. My hydraulic shop carries that same hose, are you actually disabled or do you really not understand the question?
 
IIRC the SAE spec that the relevant FMVSS references doesn't care about the ends. It just specifies the forces the hose has to withstand. The only one that sticks out to me as something that would be hard to achieve without crimped ends is the pull force which IIRC is 600lb (don't quote me on that, it's been a few years and I no longer have access to the spec). If you can make a braided stainless hose do what the spec asks then it's DOT compliant whether you think it is or not.

As I wrote before the ends have to be crimped to be DOT compliant. I guess technically you could use a reusable fitting and smash it with a hammer and call it crimped. There are more requirements such as labeling. More of the legal documentation can be found here:

https://www.law.cornell.edu/cfr/text/49/571.106

49 CFR § 571.106 - Standard No. 106; Brake hoses.

S5. Requirements - hydraulic brake hose, brake hose assemblies, and brake hose end fittings.

S5.1 Construction.

(a) Each hydraulic brake hose assembly shall have permanently attached brake hose end fittings which are attached by deformation of the fitting about the hose by crimping or swaging.
 
:flipoff2:This is the rear. The braided lines are only at the wheel ends. Everything else is steel or NICOP.

B3976E93-48BD-467C-80FF-9380A9706680.jpeg
 
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Their shit won’t work. Looking for metric.

Out of curiosity, what part is metric?

I used -3 to 10mm banjo adapters. Carry a spare hose / adapter and 3/8-24 bolt in case we need to plug the block port with a damaged line.
 
Out of curiosity, what part is metric?

I used -3 to 10mm banjo adapters. Carry a spare hose / adapter and 3/8-24 bolt in case we need to plug the block port with a damaged line.

Not looking for adapters. I already stated that part.
 
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