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Breaking in Modern Engines

Donk

Piss Artist Formerly Known As OllieNZ
Joined
May 19, 2020
Member Number
48
Messages
969
Loc
Limeyland
I'm struggling to find a consistent method for breaking a modern diesel engine.
Manufacturer doesn't really give much info except not to push it too much during the first couple of hundred miles and do the the first oil change at the recommended service interval (15k iirc)

This just seems too simple....

WWIBBD?
 
it's not the 70's.
tolerances are tighter. lubes are better.
there's no "wearing in" of parts over 3k miles.

run it.
and don't be a pansy, seat the rings with combustion pressure.
 
Hook em up and run it, they need a load to seat the rings properly. I wouldn't hook up 20k and go on a cross country road trip with it but pulling a good load for short shots for the first couple thousand miles will be just fine. Change the oil at 5k and again at 10k then go with whatever the service interval is.
 
Break it in like you are going to drive it. Short of all day runs pulling max weight, you aren't going to hurt it.
 
Is this engine powering a ship, train, truck, lawnmower or generator?

Non specific post is non specific :flipoff2:
 
Where I used to work.
Deisel forklift engines that got freshly rebuilt lasted longer and made more power when they were ran balls to the wall after a rebuild.
The engines that were ran by slow drivers were terrible.
 
Ram dealer told me to load up the 5500 and run it.
 
I change the oil the first time before 1000 miles, I otherwise just drive them without even thinking about it. I’ve had a lot of brand new trucks (9 I think) and knock on wood have never had engine problems.
 
Where I used to work.
Deisel forklift engines that got freshly rebuilt lasted longer and made more power when they were ran balls to the wall after a rebuild.
The engines that were ran by slow drivers were terrible.

If you don't seat the rings right away you'll never get them seated and you will always have the blowby.

Like I said, it's not the 70's. You don't have shit machined cranks and what not that are going to wear in on the bearings.

the only concern is the rings, and you seat those with load.
https://www.enginebuildermag.com/2018/05/how-to-break-in-your-piston-rings-the-right-way/
 
If you don't seat the rings right away you'll never get them seated and you will always have the blowby.

Like I said, it's not the 70's. You don't have shit machined cranks and what not that are going to wear in on the bearings.

the only concern is the rings, and you seat those with load.
https://www.enginebuildermag.com/2018/05/how-to-break-in-your-piston-rings-the-right-way/

That was what I was concerned about, more so than anything else which is why the manufacturers directions seemed stupid :rolleyes:

That's a good read, thanks for that.
 
Is this engine powering a ship, train, truck, lawnmower or generator?

Non specific post is non specific :flipoff2:

Does it actually matter? It's an engine that was designed within the last 20 years so modern seems to fit :homer:





It's for a car btw. BMW 118d N47D20C if you want to be specific :flipoff2:
 
Does it actually matter? It's an engine that was designed within the last 20 years so modern seems to fit :homer:





It's for a car btw. BMW 118d N47D20C if you want to be specific :flipoff2:

well it's not gonna make it passed 100K anyhow, so it doesn't really matter then
:flipoff2:
 
When you bought a new car do you think the lot porter at the dealer ship, or the cargo loader on the train/boat/yard gave a crap and warmed up your motor and did all this procedures?
Same goes with braking in gears.

I just change the oil sooner because it gives you a warm feeling inside you did something.
 
When you bought a new car do you think the lot porter at the dealer ship, or the cargo loader on the train/boat/yard gave a crap and warmed up your motor and did all this procedures?
Same goes with braking in gears.

I just change the oil sooner because it gives you a warm feeling inside you did something.

Wasnt there some internet story about a dude freaking out that his new car had 5 miles on it and someone could have been doing burnouts, drag racing, etc during those miles?

If you want to do anything send an oil sample off after a couple thousand and see what they say. Or just make it the goal to blow it while still under warranty.
 
point proven.

did you take any photos and shit?
I'm merely curious.

I will say that the harder I flog my n52 the better it runs.
I think most people do not drive the flagship hard enough and it causes long term issues.

aside from the oil leaks. those are just part and parcel of the brand it seems.
 
point proven.

did you take any photos and shit?
I'm merely curious.

I will say that the harder I flog my n52 the better it runs.
I think most people do not drive the flagship hard enough and it causes long term issues.

aside from the oil leaks. those are just part and parcel of the brand it seems.

The car is a rescue (some people rescue dogs, I rescue cars :laughing:) and the rebuild is as a result of an incorrectly fitted oil filter o-ring causing it to dump it's oil and it got worse from there. The previous owner was your typical young BMW and his first thought was not stop when it started running like a bag of nails but try drive it to the shop :homer:

I've not taken many pictures sorry, here's a couple that I did take.
No 1 rod....
IMG_20200803_135035167.jpg


:lmao:​​
Freshly reground and crack checked used crank (old one was too worn to be reground)
IMG_20200916_170335610.jpg


Fucked Oil pump
IMG_20200917_180834570_HDR.jpg

IMG_20200917_180842968.jpg


Head after being refitted
IMG_20201030_115233962.jpg

It's now at the point where I've just got to refit the covers and it can go back in.

If it had the chain on the front I'd say it was a well thought out design. It's quite light, seriously rigid and pretty easy to work on. The only real issues I've had were a stuck injector (par for course with any DI engine) and the fact you need a tonne of special tools to get everything timed up.
​​​​​​
 
holy shit.

I know there was a shit ton of warning lights while that was going down too.
 
holy shit.

I know there was a shit ton of warning lights while that was going down too.

That no 1 big end is massively worn away on the rod side and the crankshaft had a bit over 1mm worn off the diameter.
Supposedly it lit up like a Christmas tree and started shaking like a leaf and finally shit the bed just as he made it to the garage forecourt but he must have driven it a while to do that amount of damage.

I guess some people shouldn't be allowed to operate anything mechanical I suppose :rolleyes:


 
I'm impressed :laughing: And I really wish we could get more engines like that stateside without major hassles.
 
I recall a few things from building and testing Indycar motors, back when they were running the Olds and Nissan motors, late 90's. We worked with Royal Purple who were sponsors of the team.

They formulated a "special blend" for us to run the motors in on the dyno before the first pull. Literally about 5 - 10 mins of warmup until oil temps stabilized, then a couple hard pulls (to seat the rings), then oil change to synthetic, and run it in anger.

- Don't use synthetic during the run in, not because it is too "slippery", but because it is too expensive to run the synth for only a few minutes and then change it. Turns out the "special blend" was dyno oil with the purple dye. Basically you are using the warm up oil to flush and clean the engine of the assembly lube and any particles that were missed in cleaning
- Having run marine and heavy diesels, I typically prefer Shell Rotella, I also use the Royal Purple blend in the F350 but only because I get it at such a discounted price
- As 87manche posted, use the cylinder pressure to seat the rings. Cannot recall the exact figures but on a Haybusa motor built for a P2 sports racer, there was a marginal but noticeable power difference between a motor that was run hard from the very first pull on the dyno, compared to a motor that was never run hard at all, like about 5hp on 180hp motor
- My buddy is one of the best Formula Ford motor builders in the US, he warms up the motor on the dyno, usually 10 - 15 mins, then straight into hard pulls, changes the oil, crates it and ships it
- Pull the oil filter, cut it open and inspect for any shiny particles, or use a magnet over the pleats to see if you have floating particles of death
- I have been a big believer in oil samples prefer Titan based in Denver CO. For the diesel transporter on the race team, we used to sample the oil and use that as a guide on oil changes. Using Rotella, we were able to double the service interval. used to be $10 per test if you pre-purchased 10 tests, think it has gone to $15 per

Nice work Ollie
 
Zip ties n bias plies that shit. Fire it up and immediately feed her the ketchup:flipoff2:

Pretty much what I did to the 5.9 I had rebuilt. 20klbs from the get go after I sorted out the cooling fuckup. It ran great for 50k miles till the truck got torched.
 
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