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Suicide rates up

grumpy356

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https://www.aier.org/article/lockdown-suicide-data-reveal-predictable-tragedy




On March 28, the American Institute for Economic Research ran a terrifying article that didn’t receive the attention it deserved, even though the research behind it was impeccable and detailed. It was Drugs, Suicide, and Crime: Empirical Estimates of the Human Toll of the Shutdown. On suicide in particular, the article said the following:
Whether it is the direct unemployment effect or the potential poverty produced from the economic shutdown that leads to greater suicides, an increase from the 48,344 suicides and 1,400,000 suicide attempts in the US in 2018 should give decision-makers pause during their response to this pandemic.​

That article created in me a sense of dread. The warning was issued but unheeded. And sure enough, we now read that “California doctors say they’ve seen more deaths from suicide than coronavirus since lockdowns.”
Doctors in Northern California say they have seen more deaths from suicide than they’ve seen from the coronavirus during the pandemic.

“The numbers are unprecedented,” Dr. Mike deBoisblanc of John Muir Medical Center in Walnut Creek, California, told ABC 7 News about the increase of suicide deaths adding that he’s seen a “year’s worth of suicides” in the last four weeks alone.

DeBoisblanc said he believes it’s time for California officials to end the stay-at-home order and let people back out into their communities.

“Personally, I think it’s time,” he said. “I think, originally, this was put in place to flatten the curve and to make sure hospitals have the resources to take care of COVID patients. We have the current resources to do that, and our other community health is suffering.”

Kacey Hansen, a trauma center nurse at John Muir Medical Center for over 30 years, says she’s not only worried about the increased suicide attempts but also about the hospital’s ability to save as many patients as usual.

“What I have seen recently, I have never seen before,” Hansen said. “I have never seen so much intentional injury.”…​

By late March, more people had died in just one Tennessee county from suicide than had died in the entire state directly from the virus. Data out of Arizona show a similar trend.

I’m thinking that you know many people who have privately admitted to you that they have variously entered into a dark place during these times. Unemployment and having your bank account drained can do that.

It’s not just about money. Even if material provision is present, the sudden loss of freedom and life control is demoralizing and debilitating. We have always taken it for granted in America that we are in charge of our own futures. Then one day, without warning, without consultation of voters, without votes from legislatures, it was all gone. Schools, bars, gyms, parks, and whole cities were forcibly shut by executive edict, all in the name of virus control with precious little thought put to the costs or legal protections we believed were in place to protect our freedom and property. Zoom became our social outlet – and it’s a very poor substitute for the real thing. Life purpose became unclear.

Which is what makes this New York Times headline so preposterous: Is the Pandemic Sparking Suicide?
>


The pandemic did this? Even the content alone shows that fear of disease pales in comparison to economic hardship in driving suicide. In addition, there is another huge factor: mandatory social separation is a psychological disaster.
“It’s a natural experiment, in a way,” said Matthew Nock, a psychology professor at Harvard. “There’s not only an increase in anxiety, but the more important piece is social isolation.” He added, “We’ve never had anything like this — and we know social isolation is related to suicide.”​

So, yes, this can generate terrifying but predictable results. Again, the problem is material but, more profoundly, it is spiritual. Lockdowns crush dreams, impose a loss of control, separate you from friends, surround you people with police ready to arrest you for doing what only a few days earlier was perfectly normal and legal. It just didn’t seem possible that something like this could happen in America but it did.

At the same time, we are profoundly aware too that many people have been enthusiastic participants in lockdown culture. Given the scant science and medical evidence that they save lives, that they are actually achieving the goal, how can we account for the many people who not only did not enter into a dark place but rather found new purpose through them?

I draw your attention to a neglected classic: War Is a Force that Gives Us Meaning by Chris Hedges. Hedges was a foreign affairs correspondent for the New York Times, and travelled the world covering war zones in Latin America, Sudan, and other hotspots. He began to notice a pattern in modern war. It not only rattled front-line soldiers. It shook entire societies and corrupted everyone. Everyone in society was dragged into it, many on the side of the state and believing that they were on a eschatological mission to defeat evil. They turn against dissidents and those who are insufficiently enthusiastic.

“The communal march against an enemy generates a warm, unfamiliar bond with our neighbors, our community, our nation, wiping out unsettling undercurrents of alienation and dislocation,” he writes. He concludes that in societies where regular life and peace seem to lack meaning for people, war gives them that meaning and purpose.

This book keeps coming back to me when people ask how it is that these lockdowns seem to have enjoyed some measure of public support, at least in the first month or so. It’s a difficult question to answer since human beings don’t usually welcome being treated like animals and pushed around with billy clubs and sprayed with mace when they resist. On the other hand, violence, shock, and awe can feel temporarily satisfying and meaningful for people who have otherwise lost a sense of life purpose.

These days in which I’m writing feel very good as compared with the last three months. People are coming to their senses and things are opening up. So many people have said something to me about how they are “so over this.” Good. I’m also receiving fewer calls from friends who are despondent. Maybe the worst is over.

And yet that data will be pouring in for many months and years: suicides, overdoses, domestic abuse, and every manner of social pathology. It was predicted and predictable. And tragically, many businesses that could help in the mental-health recovery process have closed due to the lockdown. For years we will be left with the question of why. It’s too early for final answers, but the question will haunt us for the rest of our lives.
 

grumpy356

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It’s an op/ed but it’s well researched and on point
 

Provience

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the op-ed is good, but it isn't like he is giving an opinion on some made up stuff. the research is there. the evidence is there.

this is a big part of why, since the beginning, it was so difficult for so many to accept the rationale of the shutdown.
 

Gatorgrizz27

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Predicted this as soon as this bullshit lockdown started rolling. More divorces will happen too.
 

ConwayMuddy

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I'm still working, and constantly worried about what the future holds. If I didnt laugh at the fact that I bust ass for less than people are taking home in just the bonus, I'd probably paint a wall with brains.
 

Provience

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as did i..... little did i know i would end up as one of the divorce statistics.

well damn, congrats on the divorce. bummer it had to happen during the social distancing times, hopefully she remarries quickly and saves you a bunch of money.
 

Navydoc8778

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I know my work rate has gone up as far as suicides. People getting stuck together more than they are used to in incompatible marriages/relationships, and deciding bullets or pills are the best answer. Sucks for the kids when they are involved.
 

Thefishguy77

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Yup I called this as well. The amount of people that will die due to domestic violence and suicide and starvation in the coming depression will far out weight the amount of people who die from the beer flu. :(
I am lucky having some land against the forest so I can get outside and keep busy. I couldn’t imagine living in a condo or small neighborhood, I think I would be on a first name basis with officers because I am not a SIP sort of person.
 

Kaptain

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Yup I called this as well. The amount of people that will die due to domestic violence and suicide and starvation in the coming depression will far out weight the amount of people who die from the beer flu. :(
I am lucky having some land against the forest so I can get outside and keep busy. I couldn’t imagine living in a condo or small neighborhood, I think I would be on a first name basis with officers because I am not a SIP sort of person.

Yep, exactly... I'm thankful to have a home, some land, and numerous projects going on to keep myself busy. I also couldn't imagine being stuck in an apartment with nothing else to do but binge watch some bullshit on netflix
 

Fishbone333

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2 blocks from my house a dude just shot his wife, 10 yr old daughter and himself of monday. 2 other kids survived cuz they were hiding under the bed. :eek::mad3:
 

BUCKLAND

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2 blocks from my house a dude just shot his wife, 10 yr old daughter and himself of monday. 2 other kids survived cuz they were hiding under the bed. :eek::mad3:

Piece of shit, the survivors will not have it easy.
 

grumpy356

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https://townhall.com/tipsheet/micael...73278?amp=true

CDC Director Says There are More Suicides and Overdoses than COVID Deaths



Center for Disease Control Director Robert Redfield testified in a Buck Institute webinarthat suicides and drug overdoses have surpassed the death rate for COVID-19. Redfield argued that lockdowns and lack of public schooling constituted a disproportionally negative impact on young peoples’ mental health.

“We’re seeing, sadly, far greater suicides now than we are deaths from COVID. We’re seeing far greater deaths from drug overdose that are above excess that we had as background than we are seeing the deaths from COVID,” he said.

Roughly 146,000 people have died from COVID or COVID-related causes in the U.S., according to CDC data.

The most recent publicized federal datarecords 48,000 deaths from suicide and at least 1.4 million attempts in 2018. In 2019, almost 71,000 people died from drug overdoses.

Where Redfield obtained his data is unknown, although a doctor at John Muir Medical Center in Walnut Creek, CA claimed the facility has “seen a year’s worth of suicide attempts in the last four weeks.” He did not say how many deaths occurred, or whether the statement was exaggerated for emphasis.

"What I have seen recently, I have never seen before," Hansen said. "I have never seen so much intentional injury,” said a nurse from the same hospital.

And while health authorities will not have verified data regarding suicides and drug overdoses in 2020 for two more years, local reporting indicates that suicide fatalities have increased year-on-year.

According to the American Medical Association, “More than 35 states have reported increases in opioid-related mortality as well as ongoing concerns for those with a mental illness or substance use disorder in counties and other areas within the state.”

In Eagle County, Colorado, six suicides have been recorded, just one below the yearly average. Colorado on the whole recorded a 40 percent decrease in suicides in March and April, but the number of calls to Colorado Crisis Services increased 48 percent.

The Chicago Sun-Times looked specifically at black populations. In Cook County, Illinois, the number of suicide deaths is already higher than for all of 2019.

In Yakima County, Washington, the suicide rate has risen 30 percent, according to the county coroner.

Between March 15 and April 29, as many people commited suicide in Queens, New York than did between January 1 and April 29 the year prior.

The Pima County Health Department in Arizona has recorded an uptick in suicide rates as well.

Ulster County reported a significant increase in both suicides and drug overdoses, both fatal and non-fatal.

Historical trends give reason to believe the suicide rate may rise due to extenuating circumstances caused by COVID-19, including unemployment and social isolation. For example, in the year after the Great Recession in 2008, the rate in America was 6.4 percent higher than expected. While the rate didn’t’ “skyrocket,” as some have predicted it will this year, the coronavirus pandemic and economic shutdown has dealt a worse blow to the U.S. psyche.

Thirty to 40 million jobs have been lost to the economic shutdown, compared to 2.6 million in 2008.
 

grumpy356

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https://www.msn.com/en-us/health/me...ovid-cdc-director-says/ar-BB17iype?li=BBnb7Kz

With infection rates and death tolls from the coronavirus mounting by the day, it can become easy to forget that there are other epidemics that are plaguing Americans nationwide. And while the pandemic is largely taking a direct toll on the older segments of the population, young peoples' lives are being impacted by other crises. According to one of the nation's top health officials, there are tragically two things that are killing more young people than COVID itself.

In an online interview with the Buck Institute earlier this month, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) Director Robert Redfield, MD, candidly discussed how school closures have affected children and teenagers across the country—and how previously existing issues are becoming an even bigger problem for young people. "We're seeing, sadly, far greater suicides now than we are deaths from COVID. We're seeing far greater deaths from drug overdose that are above excess that we had as background than we are seeing the deaths from COVID," Redfield said.
BB17iExq.img
© Provided by Best Life A teenage girl with dark hair looks out a window with a sad look on her face.

His comments highlight issues that were already considered epidemics within the U.S. but have seen a tragic increase for young people in the months since COVID-19 forced nationwide shutdowns. A brief released by the American Medical Association (AMA) in early July stated that they were "greatly concerned by an increasing number of reports from national, state, and local media suggesting increases in opioid-related mortality," citing an increase in overdoses in 35 states.

These issues have become even more alarming because the assistance and resources dedicated to them have either become overwhelmed due to COVID or are now simply too dangerous to access. A June survey by the Addiction Policy Forum found that 20 percent of respondents reported increased substance abuse and 34 percent reported a change to their recovery or treatment due to the pandemic.

"I'm a firm adherent to the idea that the opposite of addiction is not sobriety, the opposite of addiction is connection," Mike Brumage, MD, former director of the West Virginia office of drug control policy, told The Guardian. "Clearly, what we have lost with the pandemic is a loss of connection."


And as the growing substance abuse epidemic continues to worsen, suicide among young people continues to pose a serious public health threat. According to the CDC, suicide is the leading cause of death among individuals between the ages of 10 and 34 in the United States.

With pandemic-related isolation brought on by school closures and social distancing guidelines, many vulnerable young people find themselves grappling with mental health issues now more than ever before. "A lot of people are calling attention to coronavirus because it's right in front of us," one 18-year-old told NPR. "But at the same time, teens' depression rate—it's a silent threat."
 

SomeGuy

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How about deaths from other illnesses like the flu or whatnot? Are those down?
How about automotive related deaths? Are those down?


I wonder what the overall death rate will be when this is all said and done...I actually wouldn't be surprised if the total death rate for 2020 goes down because people aren't out doing stupid shit or getting sick from other diseases either.
 

SanDiegoCJ

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People are losing their jobs and livelihoods and are locked in their homes over a virus that has a 99% survival rate. It's no wonder people want to kill themselves.

There's also been lots and lots of mentions about this in our local paper, on the local TV news, and most of the intardnet news sites. It's gotten plenty of "air time".
 

DWT

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If the rona don't wipe out all of the weak the suicide might come in and pick up the spares.
 

Boss

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So when can we start taking out the real enemy? Probably should wait for the police to be defunded I guess.:homer:
 

Provience

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How about deaths from other illnesses like the flu or whatnot? Are those down?
How about automotive related deaths? Are those down?


I wonder what the overall death rate will be when this is all said and done...I actually wouldn't be surprised if the total death rate for 2020 goes down because people aren't out doing stupid shit or getting sick from other diseases either.

it'll be a couple years before we get those numbers firmed up, but as for the flu vs whatnot, discounting the 'rona effect, we had a couple weeks with excess deaths, including the 'rona, a couple months for the country as a whole.

WA state for example is pretty much inline with expectations. can't remember offhand which thread i've been putting the charts and numbers in
 

FleshEater

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I think suicides are about to take an even bigger jump once the extra $600 shuts off.

We mainly hire disabled individuals in my company. One of my employees text me the other day stating their depression was really starting to bother them again. There's nothing I can do. The work is gone, and sadly the majority of our work is going to be gone forever. A lot of the people who took the voluntary furlough due to fear, won't be coming back and will struggle to compete in a job market that isn't forced to hire them over someone with no issues.

My situation is specific, but there are a lot of people who are not going to have work to return to.
 

Slander

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Right wing media propaganda, every knows cutting off ones way to make money and then telling them they are going to die 24/7 would not have an effect on ones psychological state.
 

grumpy356

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Right wing media propaganda, every knows cutting off ones way to make money and then telling them they are going to die 24/7 would not have an effect on ones psychological state.

I knew people would have a problem with Townhall, so i posted msn too.
 

ExWrench

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How about deaths from other illnesses like the flu or whatnot? Are those down?
How about automotive related deaths? Are those down?


I wonder what the overall death rate will be when this is all said and done...I actually wouldn't be surprised if the total death rate for 2020 goes down because people aren't out doing stupid shit or getting sick from other diseases either.

People dying from living is natural.

People dying from not living is not.
 
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