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Sliders - welded or bolted to the frame?

Texas H.M.

Esquire
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2000 Excursion (yeah, I know - like that'll see rocks 😉). My factory running boards are getting soft spots so I figured that I would replace them with sliders and steps. My dilemma is whether or not to weld them or bolt them to the frame rails. I don't want to use the normal step mounts 'cuz the rockers are kinda rusty, too.

...discuss.
 
For that kind of rig I would bolt them on. For a rig wheeling weld them.
 
I would weld them, I could see making bolt on shit taking 3 times as long
 
i always suggest to other people that they should make them bolt on.

bolt is the way to go, replaceable, repairable, easier to modify, not married to a particular thing, you get to run it as an even better frame stiffener so it won't rip off or anything weird. always make as much stuff easily removable whenever possible.

for my own stuff? weld all day long. i'm not taking the extra time and cost to bolt on a slider :flipoff2:
 
Weld it, fuck bolting it on. Takes a shit ton of time, and I'll guarantee you'll need to reroute electrical and maybe even fuel lines to get it bolted.
 
Weld it, fuck bolting it on. Takes a shit ton of time, and I'll guarantee you'll need to reroute electrical and maybe even fuel lines to get it bolted.

:laughing:

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I’d weld it. Bolts are fine but it will take longer.
 
If you decide to weld them, then weld them in a diamond against the frame. This may mean welding the sliders to a diamond shaped plate that is welded to the frame. It will be much stronger this way.
 
:lmao:I read that after i posted and decided to leave it, i figured I'd get destroyed over it, but nope, you're the first to notice:beer:

if welding on the opposite side of the frame from a fuel line mounted on a standoff is enough to cause a fire, you're shit was about to explode anyways :flipoff2:
 
If you decide to weld them, then weld them in a diamond against the frame. This may mean welding the sliders to a diamond shaped plate that is welded to the frame. It will be much stronger this way.

You mean turn the tube 45*? Seems like that would be weaker than straight up-and-down sides. All upward force (on the weld) concentrates in one place at the bottom of the 'V', and it doesn't have sides parallel to upward force (like an I-beam).


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You mean turn the tube 45*? Seems like that would be weaker than straight up-and-down sides. All upward force (on the weld) concentrates in one place at the bottom of the 'V', and it doesn't have sides parallel to upward force (like an I-beam).


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I think he means weld them to a diamond shaped plate on the frame.
 
If you decide to weld them, then weld them in a diamond against the frame. This may mean welding the sliders to a diamond shaped plate that is welded to the frame. It will be much stronger this way.

Free engineering from Irate🍺

Usually better than medical and legal advice
 
More bolts=more better so you should just do an octogon bracket with two bolts on each edge and a little gussets between each of the bolts
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I'm gonna disagree on the whole diamond thing.

If you do do a diamond rounding the corners of the plate is more important if you do a diamond. It should be obvious how a pointy corner and single bolt gives you a nasty stress riser at the bottom.

Considering the thicknesses of the materials involved I think the diamond mounting is going to be less beneficial than the square mounting. I think having all the stress concentrated into a point is going to negate the benefit of the small increase in vertical area over which it is spread. I think if you need more vertical spread you should be using a bigger flange instead of turning it 45deg

My feeling on the issue is that having a cross-member tying the two frame rails together and preventing them from twisting where your sliders bolt in is far more important than the mounting pattern you choose. The 1.5ish ft of leverage that the slider has is a lot, especially when you apply it in the web of a C-channel.

I think in a perfect world you'd bolt the front of the sliders in using the existing cab mount bracket holes (sandwich the cab bracket in there) and do a crossmember tying both together since that's already a high stress area that could benifit from the crossmember and you're not drilling extra holes that way.
 
To add to that, you can pretty much avoid "diaphragming" the side of the frame by running a rectangular doubler plate all the way from the top to the bottom. That transfers the load to the stronger corners and top/bottom surfaces.
 
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