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Rivnuts

Boss

Rabble-Rouser
Joined
May 19, 2020
Member Number
272
Messages
1,545
Loc
Salem Oregon
Not sure why it took so long for me to get these damn things. I always thought the tool was going to be expensive I guess. :homer: ..The tool can be had for around $50.

I bought a bag of 10-24 rivnuts as I needed them for a specific purpose. Didn't want the tool because I was going to make one. ...then I saw an ad on Amazon for a cheap simple tool for $10. I snagged it as well. Fuck these things are awesome. They are now all over my jeep an hvac system now
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:laughing:

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Get the drill operated tool from Astro Pneumatic and run it with a nice cordless. At least that way you are only in the last century.
 
I love those things, I use them all over the place. On my 33 the aluminum inside door panels are held on with a bunch of little 6-32 screws and rivnuts, and the lower radiator mounts use 3/8" rivnuts right into the crossmember.

If you're gonna be doing small ones like the 6-32, buy a bunch of hardened 6-32 allen screws, you'll be snapping them fairly often, the little ones are a little harder to tell when it's fully seated. If you actually have access to see the back of it, I measured one that I new was fully seated, and made sure the rest were about that same measurement.

12 rivnuts on each door, probably broke 5 screws :lmao:

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Get the drill operated tool from Astro Pneumatic and run it with a nice cordless. At least that way you are only in the last century.

I didn't think I'd need one but I've used half this bag already and don't see me stopping. :laughing:

I couldn't decide which tool and talked myself into just taking the cheap route to get the job done. I read reviews that people were pulling the thread or breaking the smaller ones. That would just piss me off. This being manual would give me the feel for what kind of pressure it takes. If I need bigger ones I'll definitely get the tool. I'll look up the Astro pneumatic.
 
They are pretty cool.

If removing the screws later, tighten the screw a little before backing them out.

Before reinstalling the panels, brackets, whatever, take the rivnut tool and reset the rivnut. Trust me.
 
I love those things, I use them all over the place. On my 33 the aluminum inside door panels are held on with a bunch of little 6-32 screws and rivnuts, and the lower radiator mounts use 3/8" rivnuts right into the crossmember.

Where did you get 6-32s ? Smallest I could find were 8-32. The kits seem to stop at 10-24.
 
They are pretty cool.

If removing the screws later, tighten the screw a little before backing them out.

Before reinstalling the panels, brackets, whatever, take the rivnut tool and reset the rivnut. Trust me.

You using splined rivnuts?
 
Can you give me a link to the cheap tool?

I need to add a few to one of my cars as well as redo a few that are already there and I don't want to spend a lot either.
 
. . . I read reviews that people were pulling the thread or breaking the smaller ones. That would just piss me off. This being manual would give me the feel for what kind of pressure it takes. If I need bigger ones I'll definitely get the tool. I'll look up the Astro pneumatic.
Exactly. I tried a couple of the fancy tools. Air powered. Etc. All junk. Ended up going really old school by making my own from a bolt, couple nuts, couple washers, and some never sieze.
 
Use anti seize on the screws. Nothing in this world is worse than removing a rivnut that broke loose from the metal it’s in with a screw that won’t come
out.

Land Rover discovery rear door ladders are a great example....
 
Yep, used it after doing a couple. I'm at about 24 rivnuts on the same screw.:smokin:

Use something. Even light duty thread lock. If using SS, try to replace the screw at least if doubtful of the threads or doesn't start easily.
 

That be the one. Works very well. Be gentle with it. It will really set the nutserts hard and that tends to pull them off center. I used a shaft collar and a handle from a Milwaukee M18 Fuel drill to put a handle on it so it wouldn't kick sideways quite so much. The advantage of that style nut setter is it doesn't turn the mandrel in the threads to collapse the rivnut. The rivnut threads on and internal tool thread pull the mandrel in. Makes for a very clean job with no stripped or under set nutserts.
 
Where did you get 6-32s ? Smallest I could find were 8-32. The kits seem to stop at 10-24.

For smallish quantities, McMaster has both 6-32 and M4. I also use Hanson Rivet and JayCee.
 
Exactly. I tried a couple of the fancy tools. Air powered. Etc. All junk. Ended up going really old school by making my own from a bolt, couple nuts, couple washers, and some never sieze.

The number one cause of mandrel failure is tipping the tool out of a straight line pull which snaps the hardened mandrel.
 
Smittybilt has a inexpensive tool that works pretty well for me.
 
Exactly. I tried a couple of the fancy tools. Air powered. Etc. All junk. Ended up going really old school by making my own from a bolt, couple nuts, couple washers, and some never sieze.

Powered ones aren't junk, you just need to get the power level set correctly. With air tools, some of them have built in regulators, if not, you need to regulate the air. You have to sacrifice a few of them to get it dialed, but once you do, it's fast. They are more meant for production stuff, where you have one size of rivet you're doing all day.


The number one cause of mandrel failure is tipping the tool out of a straight line pull which snaps the hardened mandrel.
For me, I've never snapped a larger mandrel, but those tiny 6-32 ones snap on me every so often because I try to get to aggressive and pull them too far. They can be a little hard to tell when they are fully seated. The manual ones where you have to use two wrenches can be clumsy sometimes, because it feels like you need 3 hands until you get the hang of it, so yeah, I could see miss-alignment being a problem.
 
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Oh yeah. I too bought one of the tools with the different sized dies from Amazon. I used the hell out of it on my Jeep build. Multiple sizes. 10-24, 1/4”, 3/8”, 5/16”, even a couple of metrics where required.
 
I have the Marson hand-operated setter from McMaster, I think I've only ever used it with 1/4-20, but there are a shitload of them on my buggy. I use the splined rivnuts and it's fast and easy, never had a single issue.

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The little one you turn with a wrench sucks and breaks easily. It's worth it to get the rivet gun style. The pneumatic one, maybe not so much, but the manual one for sure.
 
Forgot to add.
I like this type of tool, slower than some but good control.
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I have the Marson hand-operated setter from McMaster, I think I've only ever used it with 1/4-20, but there are a shitload of them on my buggy. I use the splined rivnuts and it's fast and easy, never had a single issue.

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The little one you turn with a wrench sucks and breaks easily. It's worth it to get the rivet gun style. The pneumatic one, maybe not so much, but the manual one for sure.

That is a pretty decent tool. 1/4-20 is about the max it is good for at reliable setting. I have set 1000's of 5/16-18 size in the steel twist resistant style with a long lever handle tool I've had for years. I prefer to have a couple of different tools set up so I don't have to swap out mandrels. I need to get another lever handle set up for 3/8".

I have the pneumatic from Astro. I was hoping it would work with the 5/16 stuff but it doesn't have enough horsepower.
 
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