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Riddle me this...

Mr Stubs

Taste my rainbow, bitches
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Why is it that every time I cover my squawk a molie with foil it will have pin holes it the next day?

8D2A6570-B28D-4C1B-8573-694D8ECC305B.jpeg
 

Ted_Kaczynski

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Dis-Similar metals, it's pretty much making a battery.

Copy pasta with more details.

"The steel (or one of the other metals in the pan) is getting oxidized by the food. These ions then steal the available electrons off of an aluminum atom, oxidizing the aluminum. The oxidized aluminum turns into aluminum oxide, probably, which is brittle and separates from the foil. Keep going with this and you end up with a hole."

It can also happen from salt and/acid corroding the aluminum foil.
 

Provience

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Dis-Similar metals, it's pretty much making a battery.

Copy pasta with more details.

"The steel (or one of the other metals in the pan) is getting oxidized by the food. These ions then steal the available electrons off of an aluminum atom, oxidizing the aluminum. The oxidized aluminum turns into aluminum oxide, probably, which is brittle and separates from the foil. Keep going with this and you end up with a hole."

It can also happen from salt and/acid corroding the aluminum foil.

damn, i was too slow :laughing:
 

Mr Stubs

Taste my rainbow, bitches
Joined
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101
Messages
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Land of liquid sunshine
Dis-Similar metals, it's pretty much making a battery.

Copy pasta with more details.

"The steel (or one of the other metals in the pan) is getting oxidized by the food. These ions then steal the available electrons off of an aluminum atom, oxidizing the aluminum. The oxidized aluminum turns into aluminum oxide, probably, which is brittle and separates from the foil. Keep going with this and you end up with a hole."

It can also happen from salt and/acid corroding the aluminum foil.
Makes sense now. I once thought it was from the lime juice but it also happened when I covered some tuna fish goop I made.
 

ExWrench

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Store your guac in a glass or ceramic container for best results.

Plastic won't participate in corrosion, but glass won't interact at all.


EDIT: to clarify - food-safe glass or ceramic (no lead or heavy metals).
 

evernoob

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I think the problem is you not eating it all in the 5 minutes after making it like every other normal human being.

Guacamole that hasn't sat for a few hours is vile. You are a disgusting avocado eater, sorry about the Kool Aide.

I bet you just pour macaroni, the cheese powder, and some milk in a bowl and eat it that way too.

Food preparation has, like.... steps.
 

evernoob

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Makes sense now. I once thought it was from the lime juice but it also happened when I covered some tuna fish goop I made.

It is from the lime juice, the acid is required to make the process happen. But that is not going to happen in plastic (battery case) or glass (old-timey 19th century parlor trick battery).

That's also why you have to let it sit for a while before it's good, it literally needs to react.

Horrible barbarians like this chump

I think the problem is you not eating it all in the 5 minutes after making it like every other normal human being.

don't understand that.

TL;DR Guacomole literally 'cooks' using a chemical reaction:

Look at the ingredients of Guac: limes, cilantro, onions, avocado, salt, then maybe peppers and tomatoes.

That's one hell of an active list. Every single one of those ingredients has enzymes and acids that convert food.

The onions have enzymes like alliinase which cause your eyes to water and make 'hot' on your tongue, enzymes are reactive.

The lime juice brings citric acid to the mix, but cutting it also releases other enzymes.

Those enzymes and the Citric acid have to act on the avocado and other ingredients. Salt is present to modulate the chemical reaction.

So guacamole is literally 'cooking' in your fridge or on the counter after you prepare it, and it takes time to be right. That's that special guacamole flavor you're after, if you aren't waiting or even putting it on the counter to come to room temp, you've literally never eaten real guacamole in your life.

A lot of peasant food is like that btw. Societies with access to reactive plants tend to have recipes like that, societies without access, like up north, tend to use biological action like fermentation for sauerkraut, kim chi, or surstromming, for example.

A good example of this is using Kiwi or Pineapple to tenderize a steak. I prefer Kiwi, has a milder taste, but you gotta be careful it will dissolve the meat.

When you realize that Long Pig is the Pacific name for human flesh, and that Pacific Islanders use pineapple in their cooking, usually with pork.... gives a whole new spin on that Hawaiian Pizza doesn't it? They used pineapple to tenderize Long Pig.
 
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