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isometric sketching on paper

B-rock

Well-known member
Joined
Jun 10, 2020
Member Number
1947
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135
Loc
warshington
is something I suck at. It makes my stick figure family look amazing. I took drafting in HS and never could get the 3 dimensional effects down. How do you all do it? I'm currently bending up some 1/2" stainless tubing by hand (with 4 or 6 bends on each run) and need to make multiples of the same piece. I drew a sketch with dimensions but I need something that is presentable to my co workers hahah
 
I am not sure what it is called but the pipe fitters I work with had graph paper set up for isometric drawings
 
The graph paper does make it easier for sure. When I had to draft by hand, I always set my angle to 30* and go from there. I generally only have to do squarish shapes now, but since I only have a 2D CAD program for Packaging Design I still have to do iso's the old fashioned way. I just don't have to deal with setting the angle on paper, the computer does that now.

Bends and curves really aren't different, you just have to set your construction lines properly for the plane you're drawing in and remember that your actual reference plane comes off the 30* axis, you have to factor that in for the angle of the arc. BUT, if you're just doing it freehand, you don't have to worry about that. Just set what your viewing plane is and sketch away. It'll either look right or it won't.
 
I found some ISO paper at work, it made free hand a LOT easier. sure I still need to hone my skills. (i feel bad at this point in my life I feel I should be a lot better at it then I am.
 
You can always hand it off like this.

photo32551.jpg
 
This is my latest draft. The part Im having trouble with is showing exactly what direction the bends need to go. Radius is whatever the tube bender is that im using. 1/2" SS tube.
20201112_113629.jpg
 
That should work. I would do the math so they have the total length and the deduction for the bends. Much easier to make the marks on a straight length and start bending. I just follow what comes with the Swagelok bender.
 
That should work. I would do the math so they have the total length and the deduction for the bends. Much easier to make the marks on a straight length and start bending. I just follow what comes with the Swagelok bender.

The problem with marking out all your bends at the same time is if the first one is off, the rest will be off. I Like to make it cut to fit. Leave a few inches on the end and then cut to fit as it's installed. It's easy enough to measure measure each bend using a square.
 
Rejected... its not on a cocktail napkin with a worn down sharpie. :flipoff2:

Well la de da look at mr fancy over here. Last week I measured a job with a chunk of weathered scaffolding plank and dull carpenters pencil :flipoff2:
 
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