What's new

Electric fuel pumps

ANGELO

Red Numb Skull
Joined
May 20, 2020
Member Number
453
Messages
687
Loc
BRADENTON FL
My second summit e pump (holley) died on my bronco. Between it being unreliable and i could hear it running over a straight piped 351m, I think I want something else.

Who makes a reliable quiet electric pump?
Its going in a 78 bronco thats getting a 460 with a quadrajunk. Now it has a returnless regulator and a racor marine fuel filter. I thinking about switching that to a return regulator and just having the return go to the 2nd intake on the filter housing.

https://www.amazon.com/40222-Facet-Dura-Lift-Fuel-9-0-11-5/dp/B076XHKG2Y?tag=91812054244-20

these are popular with the idis and supposed to be decent. Its also a puller pump so Its not going to be under water.

when i was doing research last time my pump died, I think this is the one i decided on. Not sure about the model, but it looked like this and was a carter.
https://www.summitracing.com/parts/crt-p4070

One of these fine or can i do better?
 
For a carbureted application, look no further than a Carter Rotary vane pump. They flat work. I use a P4070, but if you need more pressure, go with a P4594.

EDIT: Link for the lazy: https://www.summitracing.com/search/...ric-fuel-pumps

Also in case you aren't aware., make sure you are installing the pump as close to the tank and as low as possible. Use as much hardline as possible and rubber line only where required. Many fuel pump issues are due to shitty installations.
 
Last edited:
Carter rotary vane is the only way to go for a carb application. They do like to be gravity fed but I ran a 4070 for quite a while pulling out of the stock in cab tank on an F250 (Pulling up about 18" vertically) and it lived but it's quieter and my fuel pressure is better pulling off the bottom of a fuel cell.
 
IMG_20210318_210818.jpg

This is the current set up. I have it on the lowest part of the frame rail. It's not super close to the tank, but it's just about level with the bottom.
 
You have a filter on the suction side of the pump and it mounted 4 feet from the tank with what looks like 5/16's hose feeding it? Yeah, that pump struggled for its short life, the noise is from cavitation.

Filter needs to be on the outlet side, only the sock/screen on the pickup in the tank on the suction side. Mount the pump closer to the tank, and feed it with a bigger hose. That pump should have an internal bypass regulator if you're deadheading it against a regulator at the carb, so you don't really need a return style regulator. A return style done right after the pump dumping back to the tank would keep the pump cooler and extend its life though.
 
It's 3/8ths hose. I had the filter mounted in the engine bay, but it was heat soaking so I had to move it. I got the same performance either way. So this pump was doing good, but it's been sitting since december with ethanol free. I go to start it last week and the pumps siezed. That's what it did last year.

So would it be better to mount it next to the tank but level with the top of the tank, or where it is now level with the bottom?
 
Running the filter on the suction side is super bad for the pump. The filter doesn't need to be in the engine bay, but it MUST be on the outlet side of the pump. I would move the pump closer to the fuel tank as well; at a minimum, I would slide it down on the frame to about where you have the filter. Also, get rid of that rubber tubing and run proper hardline. You can even rent the flaring and bending tools at the parts store and it is just as cheap as rubber hose. The only places you should be using rubber is a junctions and somewhere between the frame and carburetor to prevent fatigue cracking from the drivetrain flex.
 
I think you are being to fancy, with my quadrajets I have normal 'clacky' fuel pumps, Mr gasket, or carters.
Add a cheap filter before the pump, put the pump down low so it's gravity fed and be happy.
 
Running the filter on the suction side is super bad for the pump. The filter doesn't need to be in the engine bay, but it MUST be on the outlet side of the pump. I would move the pump closer to the fuel tank as well; at a minimum, I would slide it down on the frame to about where you have the filter. Also, get rid of that rubber tubing and run proper hardline. You can even rent the flaring and bending tools at the parts store and it is just as cheap as rubber hose. The only places you should be using rubber is a junctions and somewhere between the frame and carburetor to prevent fatigue cracking from the drivetrain flex.

So having the pump closer to the tank is more important than lower? I can mount it right next to the tank, but it's going to be closer to the top.
 
I put now discontinued wix 24104 filters before my carter rotary vane pumps. I believe that it's recommended in the instructions to have a filter before the pump. Now I use a larger filter about the size of a oil filter with no problems.

I haven't had good luck with holleys.
 
https://www.amazon.com/40222-Facet-Dura-Lift-Fuel-9-0-11-5/dp/B076XHKG2Y?tag=91812054244-20

these are popular with the idis and supposed to be decent. Its also a puller pump so Its not going to be under water.

when i was doing research last time my pump died, I think this is the one i decided on. Not sure about the model, but it looked like this and was a carter.
https://www.summitracing.com/parts/crt-p4070

One of these fine or can i do better?

Do not use a facet lift pump. Been there done that. It does fine on my idi. put one on my 383 and it couldn't keep up
 
Stupid on topic question:

where can i find max viscosity for a fuel pump? how long would it last with 10-30? don't need large volume, 50psi would be good though and that seems right up the fuel pump alley.
 
On my old wheeler, which was 22re powered, so different level of fuel demand...

I bought a Volvo fuel filter, was about .75/litre capacity, gravity fed into it, to an e3000, then through a stock 22re filter. The big ass Volvo filter served as a surge tank when I was all off ****er.
 
Those facet pumps won't Feed a stock idi well, we have taken to the obnoxious Holley reds,blue,blacks. If you are looking at oilburners...
the idi guys are touring (edit touting) a walbro pump now.
On gpm the idi eats more fuel per hr than the faucet can feed.
At least mine does.
 
Last edited:
Stupid on topic question:

where can i find max viscosity for a fuel pump? how long would it last with 10-30? don't need large volume, 50psi would be good though and that seems right up the fuel pump alley.

People have been using OEM block mount cam driven fuel pumps to lube their turbos since electric fuel pumps became common. You should have no problem using the block pump to lube the turbo and an electric to drive the motor if that's what you're asking.
 
People have been using OEM block mount cam driven fuel pumps to lube their turbos since electric fuel pumps became common. You should have no problem using the block pump to lube the turbo and an electric to drive the motor if that's what you're asking.

looking for remote turbo lubrication and don't want to run the block oil line 3+ feet if I can avoid it.

motorhome application so lag isn't much of a concern and underhood space is a premium, underchassis is wide open
 
Thinking the bio\ fuge guys should know this one....
killer question.
 
looking for remote turbo lubrication and don't want to run the block oil line 3+ feet if I can avoid it.

motorhome application so lag isn't much of a concern and underhood space is a premium, underchassis is wide open

Run it. It will be fine.

Alternatively, slap a high volume oil pump in your otherwise stock engine and tee the turbo off the oil sender. You might have to spend some time screwing around drilling out fittings to get the leak size tuned just right.

Or run a rear end gear oil pump off your driveline and use that to move the oil from pan to turbo and back.

But the fuel pump is definitely the lowest buck solution.
 
  • Like
Reactions: Clb
But the fuel pump is definitely the lowest buck solution.

that's what I was hoping to hear. 1GPM @40 psi would be way plenty and is well below what gear pumps and such put out. cheap e-pump seems like the thing to use, just wasn't sure if it would grenade from the higher viscosity.
 
that's what I was hoping to hear. 1GPM @40 psi would be way plenty and is well below what gear pumps and such put out. cheap e-pump seems like the thing to use, just wasn't sure if it would grenade from the higher viscosity.

I'm talking about a block mounted diaphragm pump. I have no idea if an electric fuel pump would survive 10w30
 
Something to be aware of on the Carter pumps, they have an internal screen which can clog up and make the pump cavitate. Found this out the hard way when the pickup sock was shot...
 
I put now discontinued wix 24104 filters before my carter rotary vane pumps. I believe that it's recommended in the instructions to have a filter before the pump. Now I use a larger filter about the size of a oil filter with no problems.

I haven't had good luck with holleys.
Here it is
 

Attachments

  • 20210420_154151.jpg
    20210420_154151.jpg
    1.6 MB · Views: 47
  • 20210420_154230.jpg
    20210420_154230.jpg
    1.6 MB · Views: 49
  • 20210420_154257.jpg
    20210420_154257.jpg
    1.2 MB · Views: 42
  • 20210420_154325.jpg
    20210420_154325.jpg
    2.4 MB · Views: 45
Top Back Refresh