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Drywall or OSB?

FleshEater

Ordinary Average Guy
Joined
May 21, 2020
Member Number
832
Messages
3,487
Loc
Pennsylvania
The walls in my bigger shop are OSB. I haven’t got the ceiling finished yet. However, OSB prices have soared to almost $16 a sheet here! :eek:

Drywall is around $10.

Does anyone regret using drywall? I liked the fact that I could anchor anywhere in OSB with a screw. However, that might not be as important on a ceiling.
 
The walls in my bigger shop are OSB. I haven’t got the ceiling finished yet. However, OSB prices have soared to almost $16 a sheet here! :eek:

Drywall is around $10.

Does anyone regret using drywall? I liked the fact that I could anchor anywhere in OSB with a screw. However, that might not be as important on a ceiling.

i'd go with drywall

looks better, its more pain in ass to mud the seams but its fireproof. you need 5/8 on the ceilings

"I liked the fact that I could anchor anywhere in OSB with a screw" - this doesnt matter, if you hang anything heavy from osb itll pull out and you find the stud anyways
 
For the ceiling, look into steel paneling. The same stuff you put on the outside of a pole barn works great inside as well. I did plywood backed drywall for my walls and steel for the ceiling. If I were to do it all again, I would do 100% steel. Of course, my electrical is all in conduit, so no cutting steel around outlet boxes...

I'm in the process of finishing out my welding room, which is all steel. It's great getting a finished room without dealing with primer and paint after the paneling is up.
 
I have OSB in the finished portion of our shop. In the unfinished portion, I'm considering using drywall on the lid only and OSB on the walls.
 
Fire barrier to what? If the fire is inside already who cares if it escapes?
 
I prefer drywall. Easier to work with when installing and easier to paint to keep bright in the shop. Doesn't abrade you if you rub against it.
 
Fire barrier to what? If the fire is inside already who cares if it escapes?

Fire barrier to the structure its attached to. Say you have a trash can fire in the garage its less likely to catch a wall or ceiling on fire and burn the whole building down.
 
Fire barrier to the structure its attached to. Say you have a trash can fire in the garage its less likely to catch a wall or ceiling on fire and burn the whole building down.

I assumed the term "bigger shop" meant not attached separate building but that was a ASSumption.
 
I had OSB in the last house. I liked the durability of it and being able to mount stuff to the wall wherever I wanted it. However, I was always worried about a spark smoldering somewhere that I didn't see when grinding/welding there.

New house is Dry wall (it was cheaper). I'm digging the fire resistance aspect of it. The durability not so much. Eventually, I'll put some steel panels around the bottom 4' of the walls to help out with that.

As for the being able to mount stuff anywhere, I put up french cleats which solved that issue. Very happy with the cleats as I've probably moved the various tool boards around about a thousand times now trying to find the best place in the shop for stuff.
 
I assumed the term "bigger shop" meant not attached separate building but that was a ASSumption.

Even not attached, the fire proof aspect can keep the fire from getting to the studs or other wood structure, which then allows the fire to spread and take the entire structure down. Versus that trash fire flaring up and burning the can and singing some drywall or other ancillary loss versus starting over from scratch.

Obviously unattended or heavy fuels, you're fucked either way. But something gives you a chance in those medium events.
 
I have both. Osb against the studs and drywall on the bottom 4 ft. Best of both worlds, you can drive a screw anywhere and it has decent fire protection against random welding sparks and hot chips.
 
Even not attached, the fire proof aspect can keep the fire from getting to the studs or other wood structure, which then allows the fire to spread and take the entire structure down. Versus that trash fire flaring up and burning the can and singing some drywall or other ancillary loss versus starting over from scratch.

Obviously unattended or heavy fuels, you're fucked either way. But something gives you a chance in those medium events.

Another bad ASSumption.... Around here "bigger shop" is a red-iron building with "R" panel steel sheet exterior.
It makes sense he was suggesting stick frame as drywall would be hard with no studs?:homer:
 
I feel your pain, I remember $8 OSB sheets and budgeted for that for the shop. I was surprised to find them at $14 and a few days later up to $16
 
This is a separate building. Finding used steel around here is almost impossible. Steel building really aren’t popular yet.

I think I’m going with drywall on the ceiling. I’m not mudding it. It’ll make finding studs easy and I’ll just paint over everything. Keep the joints tight and should be good to go.

I’m not too worried about the fire aspect. I usually do all my grinding out in the middle of the building
 
This is a separate building. Finding used steel around here is almost impossible. Steel building really aren’t popular yet.

I think I’m going with drywall on the ceiling. I’m not mudding it. It’ll make finding studs easy and I’ll just paint over everything. Keep the joints tight and should be good to go.

I’m not too worried about the fire aspect. I usually do all my grinding out in the middle of the building

A "cheat" i have done on ceiling drywall:

Tape it, but only the layer of mud under the tape
Mix a bucket of drywall mix a little thinner than normal. grab a high nap paint roller
Roll the ceiing with the mud twice - once in each direction

Its faster than really mudding it and you can roll from the ground if you have a long enough pole. Ends up looks kind of like popcorn, but more subtle and hides issues quite well.
 
A "cheat" i have done on ceiling drywall:

Tape it, but only the layer of mud under the tape
Mix a bucket of drywall mix a little thinner than normal. grab a high nap paint roller
Roll the ceiing with the mud twice - once in each direction

Its faster than really mudding it and you can roll from the ground if you have a long enough pole. Ends up looks kind of like popcorn, but more subtle and hides issues quite well.

That’s a good idea, but I plan on hanging so many lights no one will be able to see my ceiling. :laughing:
 
The finished/working side of my shop is 40x50. I went OSB on the walls and interior liner steel on the ceiling.
 
7/16 OSB is up to $19 a sheet fawk, I’m guessing they are using the hell out of it somewhere
 
OSB prices always sky rocket in the middle of summer. It's gone up about $6 a sheet since spring here.
 
I'm definitely in the drywall ceiling/osb walls camp. Just make sure you paint the walls (white, or some light color) and don't leave the osb bare. Ive done this in 2 different shops now and painting the walls seemed to double the available light.

Ive got just enough light in my shop right now that ill be happy for a long time. If I went back to bare osb it would be a dungeon, and I'd have to run 3 more rows of light to get back to where I was.
 
OSB sucks and looks like shit even painted. Metal interior blocks radio waves, no phone service (aka porn connection) terrible acoustics. Drywall for the win.
:flipoff2:
 
OSB sucks and looks like shit even painted. Metal interior blocks radio waves, no phone service (aka porn connection) terrible acoustics. Drywall for the win.
:flipoff2:

Its a shop. Nobody gives a fuck. You trying to get them curtains and the "Live Laugh Love" sign over the door? I like being able to screw shit to the walls in random places. :flipoff2:
 
Most anything light enough to support by screwing straight to OSB you can support on drywall, just have to use an anchor.
 
I’ve gotten half of my shop insulated and covered in OSB. I’m now paranoid as fuck about using a grinder and catching it on fire. Maybe the paranoia will subside if I get it painted
 
I’ve gotten half of my shop insulated and covered in OSB. I’m now paranoid as fuck about using a grinder and catching it on fire. Maybe the paranoia will subside if I get it painted

Paint it and forget about it. This bench is on casters so I can roll it over by the open door doing metal work. In
20200908_144333_resize_67.jpg
the winter I got the heat on and I'm not raising the door. Grinding, cutoff wheels, it all gets sprayed all over the wall. DGAF
 
So, because OSB is stupidly outrageous right now (currently $23 a sheet). I'm tearing down the 4 panels I have up on one wall, pulling my bench off the walls, and doing the whole shop in 1/2" drywall for half the price. I have no idea what's going on with OSB, but the drywall will paint better, and I'm not mudding it. Don't need it to look pretty, just bounce light off of it, and hold insulation in.
 
I’ve gotten half of my shop insulated and covered in OSB. I’m now paranoid as fuck about using a grinder and catching it on fire. Maybe the paranoia will subside if I get it painted

Take a piece of osb outside along with a grinder and piece of steel and try to set it on fire. I think you will find it takes a lot more effort to make it happen than you were thinking. Then you will go back in the shop and get back to work.
 
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