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Diamond Battery Can Be Powered By Nuclear Waste For 28,000 Years

nahmus

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This is kinda cool if they can scale it

https://www.popularmechanics.com/sc...ive-diamond-battery-will-run-for-28000-years/

In two years, one startup says you’ll be able to buy its diamond nuclear-powered battery. Even cooler: The battery will last for up to 28,000 years.
➡ You think science is badass. So do we. Let’s nerd out over it together.


We know—that sounds wild. The potential game-changer comes from the U.S. startup NDB, which stands for Nano Diamond Battery, a “high-power diamond-based alpha, beta, and neutron voltaic battery” its research scientist founders say can give devices “life-long and green energy.”

Could NDB’s bold claim actually become a reality?

To build its nano diamond battery, NDB combines radioactive isotopes from nuclear waste with layers of paneled nano diamonds. Diamonds are a rare thing to begin with, but their extremely good heat conductance makes them even more unusual in the realm of construction of devices. Micro-sized single crystal diamonds move heat away from the radioactive isotope materials so quickly that the transaction generates electricity.

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Scientists presented the first known diamond nuclear voltaic (DNV) battery concept using waste graphite from a graphite-cooled nuclear reactor. The radioactively contaminated graphite could last thousands of years, with the heat-conducting diamonds pulling that energy away into electricity alongside it the whole time. NDB’s concept is the same, but with layers and layers of the diamond and radioactive waste panels to equal higher total amounts of energy.

NDB

You’re probably wondering what the catch is. The diamond battery uses nuclear waste, lasts thousands of years, and involves layers of only the tiniest possible diamonds? That all sounds fantastic. But the truth is more complicated. Each battery cell will produce only a minuscule amount of energy, so the cells must be combined in huge numbers in order to power regular and larger devices.

There are also some simple questions about logistics. How can a battery made from radioactive waste be safe for human use? There’s a reason it’s so complex and expensive to “dispose of” nuclear waste. It’s also costly to produce the nano diamonds because, well, diamonds are just expensive. That’s before any manufacturing takes place.

NDB addresses these questions on its corporate site:
“The DNV stacks along with the source are coated with a layer of poly-crystalline diamond, which is known for being the most thermally conductive material also has the ability to contain the radiation within the device and is the hardest material, [12] times tougher than stainless steel. This makes our product extremely tough and tamperproof.”​

The present day and the future are both littered with applications for a small, almost indestructible battery cell. You could own one watch with a single battery and pass it down for generations without a change. Even nuclear microreactors designed to last decades without any maintenance are made into battery cells.

Diamond batteries could also power certain kinds of spacecraft like satellites. The 28,000-year claims are based on low-power space applications like this, where, say, a Voyager-like space probe could function on a tiny amount of energy over an extremely long time.

And if enough of these battery cells are combined, they still could power regular stuff, keeping our small LED displays lit up, for example, while providing thrust for human spacecraft or electric cars.

After working on its battery since 2012, NDB says it will finally have a working product in 2023. The world will be waiting.
 
very interesting, i wonder what the power to size ratio is

i know the article says power output is small but i wonder how big of a "battery" would it take to power a lightbulb?
 
I'm thinking first use would be in spacecrafts and maybe satellites
 
I'm thinking first use would be in spacecrafts and maybe satellites
google you radioisotope thermal generator
been doing it since the 60s

kneejerk reaction on this new stuff is that it's probably gonna be on the shelf alongside memory wire motors and using thermocouples to scavenge waste heat
 
[486 said:
;n363616]
google you radioisotope thermal generator
been doing it since the 60s

kneejerk reaction on this new stuff is that it's probably gonna be on the shelf alongside memory wire motors and using thermocouples to scavenge waste heat

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Radioisotope_thermoelectric_generator

Radioisotope thermoelectric generator

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
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Diagram of an RTG used on the Cassini probe
A radioisotope thermoelectric generator (RTG, RITEG) is a type of nuclear battery that uses an array of thermocouples to convert the heat released by the decay of a suitable radioactive material into electricity by the Seebeck effect. This type of generator has no moving parts.

RTGs have been used as power sources in satellites, space probes, and uncrewed remote facilities such as a series of lighthouses built by the Soviet Union inside the Arctic Circle. RTGs are usually the most desirable power source for unmaintained situations that need a few hundred watts (or less) of power for durations too long for fuel cells, batteries, or generators to provide economically, and in places where solar cells are not practical. Safe use of RTGs requires containment of the radioisotopes long after the productive life of the unit. The expense of RTGs tend to limit their use to niche applications in rare or special situations.

The RTG was invented in 1954 by Mound Laboratories scientists Ken Jordan and John Birden. They were inducted into the National Inventors Hall of Fame in 2013.[SUP][1][/SUP][SUP][2][/SUP] Jordan and Birden worked on an Army Signal Corps contract (R-65-8- 998 11-SC-03-91) beginning on 1 January 1957, to conduct research on radioactive materials and thermocouples suitable for the direct conversion of heat to electrical energy using polonium-210 as the heat source. RTGs were developed in the US during the late 1950s by Mound Laboratories in Miamisburg, Ohio, under contract with the United States Atomic Energy Commission. The project was led by Dr. Bertram C. Blanke.[SUP][3][/SUP]

The first RTG launched into space by the United States was SNAP 3B in 1961 powered by 96 grams of plutonium-238 metal, aboard the Navy Transit 4A spacecraft. One of the first terrestrial uses of RTGs was in 1966 by the US Navy at uninhabited Fairway Rock in Alaska. RTGs were used at that site until 1995.

A common RTG application is spacecraft power supply. Systems for Nuclear Auxiliary Power (SNAP) units were used for probes that traveled far from the Sun rendering solar panels impractical. As such, they were used with Pioneer 10, Pioneer 11, Voyager 1, Voyager 2, Galileo, Ulysses, Cassini, New Horizons, and the Mars Science Laboratory. RTGs were used to power the two Viking landers and for the scientific experiments left on the Moon by the crews of Apollo 12 through 17 (SNAP 27s). Because the Apollo 13 Moon landing was aborted, its RTG rests in the South Pacific Ocean, in the vicinity of the Tonga Trench.[SUP][4][/SUP] RTGs were also used for the Nimbus, Transit and LES satellites. By comparison, only a few space vehicles have been launched using full-fledged nuclear reactors: the Soviet RORSAT series and the American SNAP-10A.

In addition to spacecraft, the Soviet Union built 1007 RTGs[SUP][5][/SUP] to power uncrewed lighthouses and navigation beacons on the Soviet arctic coast by the late 1980s.[SUP][5][/SUP][SUP][6][/SUP] Many different types of RTGs were built in the Soviet Union, for a wide variety of purposes. The lighthouses were not maintained for many years after the dissolution of the Soviet Union in 1991. Some of the RTG units disappeared during this time—either by looting or by the natural forces of ice/storm/sea.[SUP][5][/SUP] In 1996, a project was begun by Russian and international supporters to decommision the RTGs in the lighthouses, and by 2021, all RTGs are now removed.[SUP][5][/SUP]

As of 1992, the United States Air Force also used RTGs to power remotely-located Arctic equipment, and the US government has used hundreds of such units to power remote stations globally. Sensing stations for Top-ROCC and SEEK IGLOO radar systems, predominantly located in Alaska, use RTGs. The units use strontium-90, and a larger number of such units have been deployed both on the ground and on the ocean floor than have been used on spacecraft, with public regulatory documents suggesting that the US had deployed at least 100–150 during the 1970s and 1980s.[SUP][7][/SUP][SUP][needs update][/SUP]

In the past, small "plutonium cells" (very small [SUP]238[/SUP]Pu-powered RTGs) were used in implanted heart pacemakers to ensure a very long "battery life".[SUP][8][/SUP] As of 2004, about ninety were still in use. By the end of 2007, the number was reported to be down to just nine.[SUP][9][/SUP] The Mound Laboratory Cardiac Pacemaker program began on 1 June 1966, in conjunction with NUMEC.[SUP][10][/SUP] When it was recognized that the heat source would not remain intact during cremation, the program was cancelled in 1972 because there was no way to completely ensure that the units would not be cremated with their users' bodies.
Design[edit]


The design of an RTG is simple by the standards of nuclear technology: the main component is a sturdy container of a radioactive material (the fuel). Thermocouples are placed in the walls of the container, with the outer end of each thermocouple connected to a heat sink. Radioactive decay of the fuel produces heat. It is the temperature difference between the fuel and the heat sink that allows the thermocouples to generate electricity.

A thermocouple is a thermoelectric device that can convert thermal energy directly into electrical energy, using the Seebeck effect. It is made of two kinds of metal (or semiconductors) that can both conduct electricity. If they are connected to each other in a closed loop and the two junctions are at different temperatures, an electric current will flow in the loop. Typically a large number of thermocouples are connected in series to generate a higher voltage.
Fuels[edit]
 
Biden will band Nuclear. :p

Can't have the public with their grubby little hands on nuclear waste material. Sombody might figure out a way to make a bomb out of it or some shit.

BUT: May we intrest you in windmills and solar panels? They suck but we are going to push the fuck out if it for the next 4yrs because libtard. Pay up sucker......

:homer:


-Edit-

Snipped from the Wiki above..... Safe use of RTGs requires containment of the radioisotopes long after the productive life of the battery.
 
Last edited:
Snipped from the Wiki above..... Safe use of RTGs requires containment of the radioisotopes long after the productive life of the battery.
yup, guy I quoted says this new tech will be used an sattelites and shit, my point is that it is already used in sattelites and shit

read the article on the new thing
see how buried in there it says it generates electric from the transfer of heat? So it is just using the decay heat from the waste. Meaning, using the diamond as the thermocouple might be more efficient than previous materials, but it is still just the same thing.

The 'using nuclear waste' thing is just hype. The amount of waste heat thrown off is nothing compared to the cost of handling.
Anything using this will be using purpose-built fuel pellets just the same as all applications of the previous generation of the technology.
You might see the new generation of thermocouple technology used elsewhere that there is waste heat to be scavenged, but it is unlikely given the lack of adoption of similar technologies.
 
[486 said:
;n363642]
yup, guy I quoted says this new tech will be used an sattelites and shit, my point is that it is already used in sattelites and shit

read the article on the new thing
see how buried in there it says it generates electric from the transfer of heat? So it is just using the decay heat from the waste. Meaning, using the diamond as the thermocouple might be more efficient than previous materials, but it is still just the same thing.

The 'using nuclear waste' thing is just hype. The amount of waste heat thrown off is nothing compared to the cost of handling.
Anything using this will be using purpose-built fuel pellets just the same as all applications of the previous generation of the technology.
You might see the new generation of thermocouple technology used elsewhere that there is waste heat to be scavenged, but it is unlikely given the lack of adoption of similar technologies.

Hmmm, you truthfully understand this stuff. Go figure.
 
Hmmm, you truthfully understand this stuff. Go figure.

I really believed in nuclear energy when I was young and dumb.
Now I realize that politics will never get out of the way.
There's money to be made wasting all the easily handled sources of dense energy (coal and oil) on things like stationary power generation that are uniquely suitable for big heavy clumsy nuclear.
 
Lame.

"they still could power regular stuff, keeping our small LED displays lit up, for example"

We already have something that does that. The night sights on my pistol, for example. Provides a tiny bit of light and never needs charging.
Just use the same technology from that to light up your LED type things.
 
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