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9m x 7.5m (30 x 20?) with 3m x 9m awning - Metric Shop Poject

kiwi_steve

Land Rover Nut
Joined
May 22, 2020
Member Number
1106
Messages
16
Location
New Zealand
Yep, metric :flipoff2:

This is it, almost 100m2 of shed... I was somewhat disappointed... I think I was expecting a fleet of trucks to be dropping off large parts for days.
IMG-0372ef898b057605adc3950b68b41f28-V.jpg


The site (after knocking down a bit of fence that was in my way):
20191202_071230.jpg


Then I borrowed a digger from a friend and made a big mess. I often work on the 'how hard can it be' principle... which gets me to a point where I am forced to either admit defeat or learn new skills and git'er done... I hate to admit defeat, so now I can drive a digger and not make too much of a mess. It took a while though :D
20191213_151035.jpg


Then I though, concrete? How hard can that be? (see above)...
20191217_194057.jpg


Ask me why I was mowing the reinforcing mesh :laughing:

20191218_185542.jpg

Turns out concrete is hard (literally and figuratively). I had the help of a couple of very good friends who have every right to never speak to me again after roping them in to that... Wow - I have a lot of respect for concrete guys... they make it look easy.

More to come... I'm about half way through the build at this point... I'll add some more photos later.

Cheers, Steve
 

denis

aka Stupid fnch jackasS
Joined
May 22, 2020
Member Number
1112
Messages
52
Location
in your sisters ass
metric system FTW :D
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You should have gone at least twice as big ;)
wAAACH5BAEKAAAALAAAAAABAAEAAAICRAEAOw==

I had the help of a couple of very good friends who have every right to never speak to me again after roping them in to that...

This... or : they will come all the time to borrow shop space to work on their own shit :flipoff2:
 

kiwi_steve

Land Rover Nut
Joined
May 22, 2020
Member Number
1106
Messages
16
Location
New Zealand
metric system FTW :D
wAAACH5BAEKAAAALAAAAAABAAEAAAICRAEAOw==

You should have gone at least twice as big ;)
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This... or : they will come all the time to borrow shop space to work on their own shit :flipoff2:

Probably that :laughing:

So here is the back wall. As per the instructions, I laid it out and assembled it, then stood it in place. This is where things started to go wrong...
IMG-7524be9a99cb2f62262f6081d239c2cd-V.jpg


Once all bolted together with all the girts screwed in place I could not get it to stand flat on the pad, it wanted to teeter totter on the middle leg. I'm not a builder, nor a mathematician... but it seemed like the middle leg was too long and probably needed cut to length. Only the instructions have a sentence in big bold capital letters right at the start that says, "DON"T CUT ANYTHING, ITS ALL MANUFACTURED EXACTLY TO LENGTH IN THE FACTORY" - so I didn't. It was also christmas, so there was nobody at the office to call and ask why this perfectly designed kitset didn't work. the pad was flat, the wall was assembled correctly as per the plans (the F$%king plans... that look like a 1980's photocopy of a 1960's Gestetner copy).

I stared at this for days - I dared not cut anything, because... well, the plans. But I knew it wouldn't work - so I went around in circles and eventually removed all the centre part so I could keep going, with the hope that I could magically re-insert them later and they would somehow fit :lmao:

20200223_133500.jpg


At this point I got hold of someone who suggested I should pull it all down and start again, only this time I should cut some things! I was relieved and INCREDIBLY pissed at the same time... they cancelled each other out and I just went numb. Then pulled it all down. Then walked away for a few days and refused to even look at it.
down.jpg


Turns out that the whole mm-perfect design is based on a few factory assumptions about things that don't actually work in the real world. Those corner braces are not particularly well bent, so the brackets that screw to them to mount the top row of girts sit too far in, pushing the width of the wall out at the top and thereby flattening the roof slightly, which in turn pulls down the apex and makes the middle leg seem too long. I hope that made sense - the TL;DR is that you have to cut stuff, despite the BIG BOLD WARNING not to. Once I knew that little gem of information things went more (ish) smoothly and over a week of evenings with the help of a mate to hoist stuff up I got all the framework in place (with the exception of the stuff that needs cutting, I still couldn't quite bring myself to do that even though I knew it needed doing).
20200226_071249.jpg


Ok, more to come... suffice to say that by this point I was pretty much over steel buildings. Gimme wood anyday :laughing:
 

kiwi_steve

Land Rover Nut
Joined
May 22, 2020
Member Number
1106
Messages
16
Location
New Zealand
bracket.jpg - Click image for larger versionName:	bracket.jpgViews:	0Size:	214.9 KBID:	10146

This was the problem, the brackets at the top of the portal legs. The top row of girts is about 5mm (3/16" ish I think?) shorter to allow for the thickness of the bracket steel... only the brackets are not 90 degrees bent, and they sit way out from the edge of the portal leg anyway. They need to be at least 11-12mm shorter to fit here. In hindsight this is pretty obvious to me - but at the time it did my head in.
 
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SomeGuy

Awesome
Joined
May 19, 2020
Member Number
138
Messages
1,003
Location
Canada
The trick with metal like this is to assemble everything loose, get it all roughly in place and bolted down to the concrete...then tighten it up. All those little tolerances will be forced into place :)
 

kiwi_steve

Land Rover Nut
Joined
May 22, 2020
Member Number
1106
Messages
16
Location
New Zealand
and then.....? :laughing:

And then I did some more... see below :)

The trick with metal like this is to assemble everything loose, get it all roughly in place and bolted down to the concrete...then tighten it up. All those little tolerances will be forced into place :)

I think that works for small tolerances... unfortunately these tolerances were designed by a computer :mad3:... so the angle grinder is what fixed it. Because there is also a note in the instructions saying NOT to use angle grinders... so I figure at this point the way to get this shed together is to do the exact opposite of what the instructions say.

So a few weekends back (actually, now I think of it... it was QUITE a few, since we've had 7-odd weeks of lockdown since then) another good friend came over with his scissor lift. He's a git'er done dynamo and we (I think 'he' more than 'we' - he's awesome) got a metric shit-tonne of the roof purlins boxed up** and in place among other little jobs done or at least started. Its probably worth noting that you need friends or some pretty cool tools to do a shed like this yourself. The walls on this one are 3 meters, and the roof apex is 4 - beyond safe reach from my ladder or scaffolding. The scissor lift was a godsend. And two people at least are needed in a lot of places - standing up the end walls took 3 because they're quite floppy.

**Actually boxing up girts, purlins and portals is one of the time and back-killers of doing steel sheds. They come as a massive pile of c-section, and lots (in my one, most!) of it needs to be box section, which means fitting two C's together and then using a heap of screws at max. 600 centres (2 feet?) along each side of each one. I set up little mini-production lines, measuring one then making a pile to keep me going for a while... They're self-drilling tek-screws but they are a pain - and there are two types - Philips 'mush heads' on the outside where the wall linings go and hex heads on the inside. The hex-heads are easy to drive (and also easy to overdrive and strip!) but the Philips ones are a pain in the ass by comparison. Almost every box (actually, I think all) have one type on one side and the other type on the opposite side.
box.jpg


So by the end of the day Mark was here helping it was looking like this:
20200321_174535.jpg


There is a PA door going in the near left corner, and another into the awning in the far right. And a 3.2m x 3.2m roller door going in front. Eventually.

I've gotten the two PA door frames in. I wish I'd asked beforehand, I assumed they would be full size doors, but the bloody frames are about 6'4 high... and I'm somewhere north of that, getting close to 6'5 (:eek: imperial measurement!) So I have pushed the whole frame up a bit from what the plans say, and I'll add a draught-stop or a strip of ply or something to the bottom of the doors if they need it.
20200522_172646.jpg

And I've also finished the last of the roof framework with the awning side gutter purlins and mounting plates for the awning rafters fixed in place.

And this is as far as I have gotten so far... so the updates will probably slow to a glacial pace from here on out... its going into winter here in NZ so I have about 1 hour of light from when I get home... I'm doing what I can, when I can. I can't wait to be in it though...
20200525_170437.jpg


The next step is to get the two end wall legs in place (you can see one standing against the ladder and the other lying in front of the pad where it fell while I wasn't looking) and build out that wall... then get the diagonal bracing in. Then a few little tidy ups - like getting the walls flat (they are both bowed slightly so I'll need to slacken some of the bolts in the connectors and use some strops to pull them in a bit).

Once thats done, the walls go on! Thats going to be exciting. Then the roof, then the doors, and then the truck :)
 
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