Shop steel saw horses

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    Shop steel saw horses

    I need to build a few steel saw horses for my shop. Maybe support 1t a pair and about 34-36” high. What have you built? I beam or c- channel top, leg size and thickness, mid cross brace? Will he used more for square/rectangular than round so I don’t need rollers for pipe.

    #2
    Originally posted by BUCKLAND View Post
    I need to build a few steel saw horses for my shop. Maybe support 1t a pair and about 34-36” high. What have you built? I beam or c- channel top, leg size and thickness, mid cross brace? Will he used more for square/rectangular than round so I don’t need rollers for pipe.
    I want to build some of these style. There is a youtube video on building/testing them too.
    https://fireballtool.com/folding-sawhorse-plans/

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      #3
      Use 1/4 wall 2x2 square tube built in this configuration: /-\

      Obviously use a piece for the top bar too.

      We built some for the shop and put 3-5k lb drill bars on them all the time. Only disadvantage is they don't fold up for storage and are kinda heavy. Lol

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        #4
        That’s what I was thinking after looking at some 1.5 x 1/4 stock I have. Don’t really care about not folding, just want to be manageable to move. I have some SS bar grating I’ll put on the mid lateral for tool shelving.

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          #5
          Originally posted by BUCKLAND View Post
          I need to build a few steel saw horses for my shop. Maybe support 1t a pair and about 34-36” high. What have you built? I beam or c- channel top, leg size and thickness, mid cross brace? Will he used more for square/rectangular than round so I don’t need rollers for pipe.
          I’ll take a picture of mine tonite when I get home. They are awesome! I built them 15 years ago and they are still going strong. They are heavy but I have rested 10yd buckets on them and had no issues. They are made out of standard flat bar.

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            #6
            1 1/2” x 1/8” legs and 2x4 x 1/8” top tube.

            the 2x4 top tube allows you to slide a wood 2x4 inside to extend its width
            Attached Files

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              #7
              I made these sawhorses that stack easily and are lightweight but strong. The top is a piece of 2x4 tubing that I split lengthwise. I bolted in a 2x4 on edge on them so I would have a sacrificial surface to cut into with a circular saw.

              The jig was an absolute must and helped me to make 12 identical saw horses that all stack perfectly. Also I have the legs tilted outwards just a tad so they all taper a bit and that aides stacking as well.

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                #8
                I use I beam drops, and weld on two box tube pieces for fork pockets/stabilizers underneath. Can bolt a 2x6 or something to the top. Probably overkill and heavy for what you want but it's minimal work and can be free.

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                  #9
                  You could mount a pair of caster on the same sides of 2 legs so you just tip it up and roll it around. Obviously don’t use swivel ones and it will do you zero good in the dirt or for loading into a truck.

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                    #10
                    I used 2-7/8" 0.25"wall. No fukkin mid leg support, don't need it. They don't stack, but legs all mesh so they can be stored tight together. I have had over a ton on each one, never a concern with collapse. They aren't light, but it isn't that hard to move one at a time.

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                      #11
                      Only reason for mid leg is to set tools or materials there. Fuck putting shit on the ground just to pick it back up again

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                        #12
                        We made a bunch of these sawhorses at a place I worked at some years back. 1” square tubing and they held a retarded amount of weight on them. The legs were offset to where one would slide into another and so on for storage. They were lightweight and easy to move around. We would set very heavy pallets of steel or finished product etc etc on them. If it was too heavy we’d just toss another sawhorse up in between. Click image for larger version
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                          #13
                          I built 20 of these for a customer

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                            #14
                            44" wide 36" tall. 3" channel, scrap 1.5" pipe butt welded together for legs, 4" 3/16" gussets. They have held literal tons of weight. Best free back saving devise i have ever built. They are great to work on axles with.
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                            Last edited by YROC FAB; 08-07-2020, 12:53 AM.

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                              #15
                              Ended up going 1 1/2” 3/16 A frame with c channel c up so I can put 2 by or 4 by 4 in it as a sacrificial surface.

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