Stainless firearms, alloy?

Collapse
X
Collapse
First Prev Next Last
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

    Stainless firearms, alloy?

    I'm curious if anyone knows what alloys typically are used to make the variety of "stainless" steel firearms, receivers, barrels, internal parts, etc?

    I know a magnet will stick to the typical Savage stainless barrel, so it's some sort of 4XX series. I've not tried sticking one to other things.


    Edit, searching so far as 416 is the common one for cheaper barrels, 410 is for better barrels. Other parts seem to be a mixture, the inability to easily harden certain alloys, such as 304, means it is limited to non-wearing parts. Need to do more reading.
    Last edited by Scott Cee aka 2drx4; 07-03-2020, 02:55 PM.

    #2
    I think I found my answer. 17-4 (or 17-4PH) is what is used for all those pesky internal parts that need to last forever. Easy to machine (relatively) and you can bake it for an hour at 900* F (yeah, degrees Freedom, rather than degrees Censible Scale) to get it pretty dang hard since it comes in an "A" state.

    Comment


      #3
      I thought you might want to know its called grade if your talking stainless steel.

      303, 304, 316, 347, are a few of my favorite grades of stainless to work with.

      When dealing with AN fittings the letters K and S marked on such fittings designate 316 and 347.

      It seems to be called both grade or alloy.
      https://continentalsteel.com/stainless-steel/grades/
      Last edited by PAE; 07-04-2020, 12:50 PM.

      Comment


        #4
        Originally posted by PAE View Post
        I thought you might want to know its called grade if your talking stainless steel.

        303, 304, 316, 347, are a few of my favorite grades of stainless to work with.

        When dealing with AN fittings the letters K and S marked on such fittings designate 316 and 347.
        Grade is a commercial (marketing) term versus alloy being a technical term. Grade implies that one may be superior to the other, which they may, but all alloys are trade offs between cost, corrosion resistance, machineability, weldability, hardness/hardenability, strength, and availability. Alloy is just acknowledging exactly that, it's a fucking alloy.

        You can call it "Grade 304" but it is just SAE 304 or 304 stainless to *most* of the world.

        Comment


          #5
          I dont know why you think 416r is for cheap barrels. Noveske, seekins, bartlein and a whole bunch of other top barrel makers use it in their match grade barrels.

          Comment


            #6
            Originally posted by Stuck View Post
            I dont know why you think 416r is for cheap barrels. Noveske, seekins, bartlein and a whole bunch of other top barrel makers use it in their match grade barrels.
            Cheap is relative. 410 would give them a 30% increase in life for twice the cost because of the machining issues. Or so the few articles I found explained it. The 30% increase in life is not worth a 100% increase in price to the vast majority of customers.

            It's also the common alloy for even the cheapest of the stainless barrels it seems. Or at least I can't find anything else.

            Comment


              #7
              Originally posted by Stuck View Post
              I dont know why you think 416r is for cheap barrels. Noveske, seekins, bartlein and a whole bunch of other top barrel makers use it in their match grade barrels.
              Correct. The best barrels are made from 416R.

              Comment


                #8
                Originally posted by 300sniper View Post

                Correct. The best barrels are made from 416R.
                Because it's easier to machine?

                What are the cheapest stainless barrels made from?

                I don't really care, I can't build a barrel, but I am curious.

                Comment


                  #9
                  Originally posted by 300sniper View Post

                  Correct. The best barrels are made from 416R.
                  There are several stainless alloys that would make superior barrels. Cost is the main issue.

                  Comment


                    #10
                    Originally posted by bdkw1 View Post

                    There are several stainless alloys that would make superior barrels. Cost is the main issue.
                    What would make them superior? Easier to machine, durability, more corrosion resistant?

                    I shoot .3 moa groups with my 416r barrel all day long. Several thousand rounds so far and I havent noticed any degradation yet. Maybe some throat wear but nothing that has affected accuracy.

                    Comment


                      #11
                      Originally posted by bdkw1 View Post

                      There are several stainless alloys that would make superior barrels. Cost is the main issue.
                      Better let the benchrest shooters know. They’d spend any amount to get a superior barrel.

                      Then again, I guess we need to all agree on how “superior” is defined.

                      Comment


                        #12
                        I'm glad you guys can't read.

                        Comment


                          #13
                          Originally posted by Scott Cee aka 2drx4 View Post
                          I'm glad you guys can't read.
                          I'm glad you don't know anything about barrels. The question was asked, what makes them superior? Just the fact that they cost more? Someone mention longevity, but where? Lands? Throat? How will the accuracy be affected by this super long life barrel? Is it easier or harder to machine? 416r is used because it holds tolerances consistantly while machining the bore whether they're drawn or hammered. Air gauging 416r shows it to be very consistent along the length. Other harder longer lasting alloys don't gauge out as well and end up with less accurate because of those inconsistencies. You use whatever you want. I have three precision rifles that will shoot sub .5moa consistently all barreled with 416r. Seems pretty good to me.

                          Comment


                            #14
                            Originally posted by Scott Cee aka 2drx4 View Post
                            I'm glad you guys can't read.
                            I used 17-4 to make the barrel bushing for my...fucking forgot the brand and model, pistol that was already heat treated 1025 because it is easy to machine and wears very well. love the stuff. didn't pay much attention to what the rest of the slide and barrel lug was made out of, but it welded fine with 308 filler and machined as expected.

                            of course, it did recrack after ~750-1k rounds or whatever it was. haven't got around to rewelding it since.


                            Up is difficult, down is dangerous

                            Comment


                              #15
                              Originally posted by 300sniper View Post

                              Correct. The best barrels are made from 416R.
                              Did I read somewhere that CroMo (don't know what alloy), is actually better than SS, but it's a maintenance issue?
                              RIP PBB

                              Comment

                              Working...
                              X