Bow Hunting

Collapse
X
Collapse
First Prev Next Last
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

    Bow Hunting

    Currently hunt with my 30-30. Looking to try out bow hunting since I can do it right from my backyard and the season is a lot longer.

    Not really sure what I'm looking for. I've read PSE is a decent brand, but who knows. I also don't really know what I need in addition to the bow. Like, sights, quivers, or whatever. No idea.

    Can someone point me in the right direction? Whether it be a good site to use or personal experience. Like to keep the budget under $1500 for everything, which I hope is enough. I wouldn't mind getting something used, but again, I have no idea what to watch out for.


    #2
    Go to a pro shop. No box stores or mail order. Being new to it, you need the bow set up properly or you will struggle. With that budget you can get a decent rig set up right.

    Comment


      #3
      Originally posted by Chzbrgr View Post
      Go to a pro shop. No box stores or mail order. Being new to it, you need the bow set up properly or you will struggle. With that budget you can get a decent rig set up right.
      There is a bow shop I can go check out. I just don't want to be taken for a ride either. I'll probably just do that then.

      Comment


        #4
        Check out ArcheryTalk and Texas Bowhunter. Both are excellent resources.

        Maybe look at getting a starter bow, or a used one before dumping $1500 into something you may, or may not like. Most bow shops will have consignments that go for less also. There are a lot of people who get a new bow every year as new models are constantly rolling out.

        I’m not sure you can really go wrong on brands these days. Everyone seems to have their favorites. I’ve shot mission and obsession bows. Will probably buy a Hoyt or Mathews next time around.

        Comment


          #5
          I wanted to get into archery but didn't know where to start. Bought a used bow off my friends son for $125, the bow was probably 15 years at that point and I had never shot a compound bow. I didn't know my draw length or what I could pull. I took it to my local bow shop and told them I didn't have an idea what I was doing, but wanted to learn. I didn't even know that you needed a release to shoot, shop owner sold me a used release for cheap and didn't believe me after my first shot was a bullseye that I didn't know there were sights.
          Target shot in my yard for awhile, met my now husband and started shooting league with him and his co-workers. Bow hunted for one season and I'm glad that I missed the buck that I had a shot at. I don't remember the weight that I was pulling, but it wasn't much and would have had to have been an absolute perfect shot for it to be ethical with as low as a draw weight I had.

          Ended up going back to the bow shop after shooting that bow for a few years and knew I was into it, shot a few different bows and knew which one I liked. I bought a loaded women's Bowtech, about 5 years ago for ~$850. Husband and I bought shoot Bowtech, we each probably shoot a few thousand arrows a year and if/when we upgrade will more than likely be Bowtech. Having a great dealer near by also really helps, if our bow shop went to a different brand, I would probably go with whatever brand he was selling.

          Get your draw length measured, especially if you're going to start looking the used route and see what your draw weight should be for what species you're targeting - bows will be adjustable within a certain poundage.

          Comment


            #6
            Originally posted by YotaRedneckGirl View Post
            I wanted to get into archery but didn't know where to start. Bought a used bow off my friends son for $125, the bow was probably 15 years at that point and I had never shot a compound bow. I didn't know my draw length or what I could pull. I took it to my local bow shop and told them I didn't have an idea what I was doing, but wanted to learn. I didn't even know that you needed a release to shoot, shop owner sold me a used release for cheap and didn't believe me after my first shot was a bullseye that I didn't know there were sights.
            Target shot in my yard for awhile, met my now husband and started shooting league with him and his co-workers. Bow hunted for one season and I'm glad that I missed the buck that I had a shot at. I don't remember the weight that I was pulling, but it wasn't much and would have had to have been an absolute perfect shot for it to be ethical with as low as a draw weight I had.

            Ended up going back to the bow shop after shooting that bow for a few years and knew I was into it, shot a few different bows and knew which one I liked. I bought a loaded women's Bowtech, about 5 years ago for ~$850. Husband and I bought shoot Bowtech, we each probably shoot a few thousand arrows a year and if/when we upgrade will more than likely be Bowtech. Having a great dealer near by also really helps, if our bow shop went to a different brand, I would probably go with whatever brand he was selling.

            Get your draw length measured, especially if you're going to start looking the used route and see what your draw weight should be for what species you're targeting - bows will be adjustable within a certain poundage.
            Good stuff.

            I'm going to have to visit a place not too far away. They have a decent facility with an indoor range. I'll spend half a day there setting myself up.

            That's neat that you both are into bows. My wife said she'd like to try. Nothing crazy, but just a simple recurve bow.

            Comment


              #7
              I was given a Diamond infinity edge pro. Its a great beginner bow as its stupid adjustable, weight and length of draw, for a $300-350 package. But if you have a good bow shop go there. When I finally need/want to upgrade my bow I will buy from my local shop. So easy to have them use their press to adjust or restring it. Many bow shops have indoor ranges if you lack a place to practice.

              Comment


                #8
                Originally posted by woods View Post

                Good stuff.

                I'm going to have to visit a place not too far away. They have a decent facility with an indoor range. I'll spend half a day there setting myself up.

                That's neat that you both are into bows. My wife said she'd like to try. Nothing crazy, but just a simple recurve bow.
                Thanks! We practically have all the same hobbies, although he does not share my love of vehicles. The downfall of this is that all of our hobbies are pretty costly, so times two

                Obviously it's all in personal preference, but what Thefishguy77 said above makes a lot of sense - Diamond makes HIGHLY adjustable bows for all age ranges/draws. It's a great beginner bow for a great price. It will grow with you and if you decide you want to get more serious about box hunting, you can either hand it down or I believe they hold resale fairly well.

                Keep us posted with what you decide!

                Comment


                  #9
                  Originally posted by Thefishguy77 View Post
                  I was given a Diamond infinity edge pro. Its a great beginner bow as its stupid adjustable, weight and length of draw, for a $300-350 package. But if you have a good bow shop go there. When I finally need/want to upgrade my bow I will buy from my local shop. So easy to have them use their press to adjust or restring it. Many bow shops have indoor ranges if you lack a place to practice.
                  That’s how my mission bow was. Think I paid $500-600 fully outfitted with arrows and broad heads.

                  Comment


                    #10
                    The most important part of shooting a bow is having one that fits you. Nothing else matters. Arrows can be bought to work with your set up.

                    Comment


                      #11
                      Get your draw length measured, go to a pro shop and spend some time talking to them. Also check out reviews on the shop first, some suck. Rokslide has a wealth of knowledge. Check out nock on on YouTube, John Dudley is his name. He knows a little bit.
                      I like my PSE, but you need to try a few different bows, but also remember to consider local support. Don't buy a Matthew's when you local shop sells hoyt and bowtech.

                      Comment


                        #12
                        Draw length and learning how to set your anchor points, then repetition. We bought our 10 yo a nice bow for Xmas and it has been a blast watching him learn and giving him pointers. I like Hoyts, but am thinking about going to Elite.

                        Comment


                          #13
                          Originally posted by BUCKLAND View Post
                          Draw length and learning how to set your anchor points, then repetition. We bought our 10 yo a nice bow for Xmas and it has been a blast watching him learn and giving him pointers. I like Hoyts, but am thinking about going to Elite.
                          Elite makes nice bows. I strongly considered buy a new one a couple years ago, but found a deal on the obsession I currently have.

                          Comment


                            #14
                            IMO there isn’t a ton of technological improvement in bows from today vs mid-2000’s. Prior to that, sure, but some guys act like a 5 year old bow is a flintlock.

                            A lot of it has to do with draw cycle and feel more than actual performance. If you shoot heavier arrows around 500 gr, the shock/noise of older bows isn’t even an issue.

                            There has been more improvement in arrows than anything else, like front weighted carbon shafts and broadhead options.

                            I don’t like mechanicals, if you want the “easy button” on a budget just go with slick trick magnums. I also prefer a whisker biscuit rest over a drop away for hunting, and a standard 4 pin sight.

                            Pay attention to state laws if you think you might travel to hunt, in CO you can’t shoot over 80% let off or use a sight with a light, bow mounted rangefinder, etc.

                            Comment


                              #15
                              Totally agree with the first half of Gators post.
                              I have had reliable luck with mechanical heads and prefer adjustable single pin sights

                              Comment

                              Working...
                              X